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gypsy_dreamer
17-11-07, 10:08 AM
I keep hearing how dangerous ring-lock fencing is.

Which one is that. Could someone show me some photos. My OH showed me what he thought was ringlock but it didn't look like a dangerous sort of fence (more a sheep fence). Why is it so dangerous?

Thanks for your help.

mindari
17-11-07, 10:14 AM
As one who has it, yes its called sheep, goat, and or pig fencing and its good at keeping them in.

the danger comes if one puts its foot through it and then pulls back, major damage or in the case of one of my ponies she wrinkled her head through one of the big squares. the corners of some types have a end of wire as part of its construction.

it cost a couple of hundred to get her jaw stitched back together.

if you rug your horses you better make double sure you clip the catches inward because if they are facing out and the horse rubs on the fence it can clip itself to the wire.

her mare went ballistic and fractured her pelvis trying to get free.

i always keep the clips facing inward and so far havent had that happen.

hubby loves the stuff.

opensky
17-11-07, 12:53 PM
We had one short fenceline of it on our place (not put there by us), many years ago. A pony mare I had almost severed her foot by putting it through and pulling back in a big panic. The result was a horrific mess. She healed, but became a broodmare due to the injury. have heard of others with similar stories. Don't risk horses near it! Regards!

foxni483
17-11-07, 12:54 PM
ring lock is that sort of round/octagonal shaped stuff isn't it.
If a horse puts its leg thru it and then pulls back it tightens and pulls all the skin hoof etc off yuk :(

opensky
17-11-07, 01:06 PM
Ringlock is composed of rectangles, and where the horizontal wire meets the verticals a small 'ring' of wire is added to stabilise the weave. Under extreme pressure, (eg 400 - 500 kg horse pulling back) these rings slide along, and can tighten.

gypsy_dreamer
17-11-07, 01:51 PM
I'm pretty sure it's the stuff I'm thinking of. Just wanted to know what it looks like so I never use it.

Thanks.

Anyone got photos???

opensky
17-11-07, 02:11 PM
This site has a pic - kangaroo stuck in the ringlock - common problem if their hindlegs touch the top of it, it flips over and traps their legs.
http://en.wikipedia.org/?title=Agricultural_fencing

You may find other pics, gypsy dreamer, if you google images.
Regards!

gypsy_dreamer
18-11-07, 11:11 AM
Thanks Opensky. It was what we thought. :)

scooti
21-11-07, 06:47 AM
We came home once to find a mare had managed to get all four legs stuck in a ring lock fence. She must have slid into it on her side. The injuries were horrific, but luckily not life threatening. I have since removed every last scrap of it from my property. Nasty stuff.

Neisje
21-11-07, 02:22 PM
Any fence can be dangerous! I have seen horses ripped to shreds by that so called good white sighter wire horse fencing. And I have a very graphic picture of a (dead) horse impaled on a post and rail fence. Unfortunately I live in sheep country and ringlock is everywhere! We have it on 3 boundary fences (sheep farmers on each side) but I have electric standoffs on it, and all my internal fences are a compination of plain wire with electric, just electric tape or post and rail.

mayville lodge
21-11-07, 10:15 PM
There is an alternative mesh to ringlock - hinged joint. I've run sheep and goats and horses for about 20 years and the hinged joint has stood the test of time, but if a horse puts it's foot through it and pulls back it just pulls apart with no more injury than you may get with a plain wire fence. I've also use the dog wire version of hinged joint on my foaling paddocks for 30 years and never had a problem.

tickle
21-11-07, 11:36 PM
I concur with Mayville. I also use hinge joint (as we run a lot of goats and sheep) and I have never had a problem.

Its a cost effective option when you have large areas to fence.Just make sure you strain it properly. For this you will either have to buy or hire a hinge joint strainer and depending on the length of your panels (distance between strainer posts) you would do well to use a vehicle (4x4) pull the strain/hinge joint up. PM me if you would like more info.

As pointed out above - any fence can cause injuries, particularly if they are not erected or maintained properly.

Good luck with the fencing.

cheers
tickle

scooti
23-11-07, 12:45 AM
Do you have a pic of hinge joint fencing? - I've never heard of it.