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SweetxSavannah
05-11-09, 12:19 PM
My friend recently told me that psyllium husks are basically useless for removing sand in the horse's gut. I don't know if there IS any sand in there, in fact there probably isn't any at all, but I just want to do it as a precaution.

Does anyone know of a way to remove the sand effectively?

kait21
05-11-09, 12:32 PM
Hi SS,

A couple of years ago I got a young WB gelding you had been broken in (badly) and left until I bought him. He used to get really girthy when you did up the girth and although he never bucked when you rode him, he would often buck and leap when you put the saddle on. (very frightening, he was 17.3hh) The vet once had to visit him about something else and when we mentioned his girthy problem said that he may have a slight case of sand colic, because we had bought him from a sandy property on the sunshine coast. He said the best way to get rid of the sand was psyllium husks. You can get them from coles/woollies and feed about a cup a day. On about the 3rd day of doing it, he was better. We used to feed it to him for a week every month, and it kept him problem free for about 2 years. So I would say it was genius!

cobie
05-11-09, 12:33 PM
Mr HP has a supposedly super recipe that he will sell to you. Haven't tried it, but I've heard a few people who swear by it.

PIAS
05-11-09, 12:42 PM
Mr HP has a supposedly super recipe that he will sell to you. Haven't tried it, but I've heard a few people who swear by it.

Ah yes. The 'pure' honeycomb treatment. Hard to come by and quite expensive.

Physillium husks are excellent. We are on rather sandy soil and all the horses on the property get dosed once a month.
Cheers
PIAS

PinyPot
05-11-09, 12:43 PM
Apparently hay is the best way to remove sand. So feed hay, hay and more hay :)

njuro
05-11-09, 01:04 PM
Yes, lots of fibre is what is needed, and a variety of it if possible. Soy bean hull products work well too.

SweetxSavannah
05-11-09, 01:14 PM
Well he gets plenty of hay! Lucerne, oaten, and sometimes grass hay as well. Not to mention he grazes for a good 9hrs every day too.

Soya bean hulls... will have to look into that.

Odd though cos my friend told me psyllium husks didn't work?

Pipi
05-11-09, 02:09 PM
If you want to know if he has sand in his gut (as told to me by my vet) , take a fresh manure -careful not to take any that has been touching the ground- just scoop off the top if need be. Mix in bucket of water, stir with a stick, let settle a bit and tip off the top water keep tipping slowly as any sand that is in the gut will be in the bottom of the bucket.
Have also heard of putting in a glass jar and letting settle overnight to see the full effect clearly. But have not tried that myself.

Good luck ...

Neisje
05-11-09, 02:46 PM
I have found psylium husks to work well, and most vets agree.

shadowmystique
05-11-09, 03:49 PM
Ah yes. The 'pure' honeycomb treatment. Hard to come by and quite expensive.

Physillium husks are excellent. We are on rather sandy soil and all the horses on the property get dosed once a month.
Cheers
PIAS


No HP's method is not the "pure" honeycomb treatment and costs next to nothing to do.

Here is a link to where you can buy the recipe;

http://www.horseproblems.com.au/horse_problems_articles_for_sale.htm


Very cheap and very effective.


There have been NO conclusive studies done worldwide on psyllium husks, it is and has always been nothing but rumor that they help to clear the sand and dirt from horse's gut's.

HP's method on the other hand has been tested expensively on a huge number of horses and always with excellent results.

98% of vets have no idea how to remove sand from the horse. They recommend the psyllium husk only because that is what is currently rumored to work.

Majority of horses do have sand, dirt or grit in their gut to varying degrees. When it builds up it causes all sorts of problems.

HP's recipe has never failed to clear my horses out and I always notice the difference afterwards. Most noticeably the first time I used it, several worrying issues I had with one horse stopped immediately.

I just wanted to note... Psyllium husks do an excellent job of reducing further build up of sand due to their lubricating effect when ingested. But they do not clear out the existing build up to any great extent.

mindari
05-11-09, 03:59 PM
my friend at woy woy had a horse that nearly died a few times from being "sanded" sadly for the life of me I cant remember what the vets gave him.

soo frustrating but it wasnt husks. they drenched him with something n the resulting manure was yuk with it, remember it came out all slimey and heaps of sand in it

CateH
05-11-09, 09:06 PM
well psyllium husks do work - and have been tested and used extensively on humans in the form of Metamucil, which is prescribed by Doctors to patients with diverticulitis for example.

I had a horse who we couldn't put condition on, and the vet diagnosed sand colic - 2 weeks on metamucil or equivalent and his coat bloomed, he put on weight, basically came good.

Nothing else in the horses environment changed at this time - which pretty much narrows it down. We had already established it wasn't a virus or infection BTW.

opensky
05-11-09, 09:18 PM
A simple test to indicate if your horse may have excessive sand in the gut is to place some manure in a glass jar full of water, shake it and let it settle. Often the sand will settle at the bottom. Might be worth a try if you are in doubt....regards

PIAS
05-11-09, 10:08 PM
No HP's method is not the "pure" honeycomb treatment and costs next to nothing to do.

Here is a link to where you can buy the recipe;

http://www.horseproblems.com.au/horse_problems_articles_for_sale.htm



Well damn because I 'purchased' that off hp and it cost me $10 and it was a pure honeycomb recipe. Guess I was ripped off huh?
Cheers

PIAS
05-11-09, 10:10 PM
Mindari I think something like cod-liver oil has sometimes been used?

shaiarabs
05-11-09, 10:11 PM
there was a study done, the best results were from psyllium and very rough hay....the only thing that was iffy with the psyllium was the amount you had to feed for it to work sufficiently

Kirstys
06-11-09, 08:12 AM
Well damn because I 'purchased' that off hp and it cost me $10 and it was a pure honeycomb recipe. Guess I was ripped off huh?
Cheers

I have the recipe too, have not used it yet, but it's not pure honeycomb it calls for, but simply untreated honey, with no preservatives or heat treating like commercial honey is.

The local bee man's honey is 99.9% of the time untreated, and our local guy will give you a kilo for next to nothing when you explain it's for horses.

The recipe works (from what I can work out, help me out science buffs) because horses are lactose intolerant (recipe has milk in it), but the honey balances out the reaction, which causes a ripple effect through the gut, dislodging sand etc which passes out.

Anyways, just sharing, honey comb and honey are different, wanted to clarify :)

shadowmystique
06-11-09, 11:20 AM
Thanks Kirstys... I've always found honeycomb and untreated honey to be very different products myself, just wasn't sure how to define them.

wickwood
06-11-09, 01:42 PM
The best way is to not feed on the ground.. like your taught at Poonnniiieee Club...

reveleus
06-11-09, 07:10 PM
I've never done it before but it's probably not a bad idea considering where I live.

Where do I buy the psyllium husks, how much do I feed and for how long?

SweetxSavannah
07-11-09, 10:11 AM
I bought the recipe too and it says "candied honey" what is candied honey? Is that like the honey that goes all cloudy and thick, or is it honeycomb or what?

I am going to give it a try probably on Monday.

shadowmystique
07-11-09, 10:33 AM
Candied honey is the crystallized "old" honey you often get graded as "Stock grade" Honey. Most produce stores will stock stock grade honey. Just ask them if they have it.
Most bee keepers know what candied/crystillized honey is too.

Basically its semi granulated honey.

Kailiea
07-11-09, 10:45 AM
The P Husks really work, my horse used to colic without fail at least once a month and had done this for about 2 years, we tried everything and nothing worked, ran every test etc could not find anything. One day a vet said to try P Husks so we started him on them, he did colic once about 3 weeks later and has never coliced again since then. I have since stopped feeding them to him and he is fine without (no longer has acess to sand - pretty sure he was eating it - but was removed probably 4 months of being colic free on the sand). He has also started to put on weight which he would never do before.

Coincidence?!?

Maybe your friend tried them and there was something else wrong with the horse, who knows.

clipclop
07-11-09, 07:16 PM
Yes candied honey is the thick, cloudy, grainy stuff.My understanding is that Mr HP's recipe says to use raw,unprocessed honey with no additives, straight from the beekeeper.
Processed honey usually has glucose syrup added to it to keep it liquid and stop it going candied. So if the honey is candied then you know for sure it is pure and not just mostly glucose syrup.
Having said that you can use non-candied honey as long as it is pure/raw/unprocessed.
If you do a google search for "John Khonke psyllium" you should find one of his newsletters that tells you how much psyllium to feed.

reveleus
07-11-09, 07:32 PM
So where do we buy the P husks and how much do you feed and for how long?

reveleus
07-11-09, 07:33 PM
Sorry Clip Clop, just read your last sentence :) Where can we buy it from?

clipclop
08-11-09, 07:50 AM
Just found the John Kohnke newsletter. His recommendation is:

A supplement of a minimum of 70-100g psyllium husk per
lOOkg bodyweight or up to (lg/kg bodyweight for horses grazing
sandy areas), given for 2 consecutive days once per month is
recommended to remove sand accumulated in the hindgut. Any other
dosing program and low doses have little or no effect on removing
sand safely and efficiently.
A feeding rate of 70 -100g/100kg bodyweight given for 3-5 days once per month may be necessary to shift larger sand deposits.

I have bought 1kg bags (about $20) of it form my stockfeed supplier, otherwise a health food shop, but thats an expensive way to go. You could also try www.horsesuppliesdirect.com.au they sell a 900g bag for $28 plus postage.
You need to add it to a slightly damp feed as it will go gluggy if added to a very wet feed and the horse might turn his nose up at it.I usually sit with my horse and add a couple of handfuls at a time as she eats her feed cause she wont eat a feed with the full dose added at the start.

mindari
08-11-09, 09:58 AM
I bought the recipe too and it says "candied honey" what is candied honey? Is that like the honey that goes all cloudy and thick, or is it honeycomb or what?

I am going to give it a try probably on Monday.

put it in the fridge and it will candy fast.

umm interesting so if it doesnt candy then its been adulterated. we used to have our own bees and it always candied over winter.

tip, if you want alcholic honey, put your bees near a vinyard full of split by the rain rotting grapes, yummmm, except my mum in law snitched the lot.