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jumpingjack
24-12-10, 06:02 PM
After spending the past hour getting bot eggs off my horse, and then watching as the bot fly circles the other horse to lay - I'm wondering if anyone has any tips or tricks they use to either repel the flies or get the eggs off easily.
At the moment I use a razor to drag the eggs off, then a wash with tea tree oil and then white lotion. And of course a regular worming cycle.
But I know tomorrow there will be more eggs!

Any solutions?!!

Charlypops
24-12-10, 07:54 PM
I have always just wiped a metho soaked cloth over the eggs and left them on. Someone once told me that kills the eggs, but I don't actually know if it does.

Caille
24-12-10, 07:59 PM
I just scrape the eggs off with a bot knife. Usually, those rude little beasts will have the audacity to lay their nasty eggs on my precious pony right in front of me :eek: . I put on my riding gloves and catch them between my fingers with a *POP*! Gypsy seems to appreciate it, as she stands still and even stops swooshing her tail so I can splat the little buggers. HATEHATEHATE botflies! (I'd make a lousy entomologist)

storm horse
24-12-10, 08:28 PM
i asked a vet about using kerosene to kill the eggs...........he said it was a furphy :(

_Tash_
24-12-10, 08:49 PM
The Warhorse LOATHES botflies and will happily snap at them until she catches them in her teeth.

I think she is a little bit carnivorous :eek:

RTB
24-12-10, 10:12 PM
Bot fly knife the entire way.
I tried oils, kero and even epsom salts.

Ruby didn't mind the knife.

Vinegar repels them and is horse friendly. A few dabs on the legs and on the belly + under the chin will keep them away, it will last about 2-3 days before you have to put it back on.

jumpingjack
24-12-10, 10:47 PM
Excellent! Do you think I can train my mare to catch them in her teeth, and perhaps protect to two ponies too!!!??

Yes, I'm not keen on Kero on the legs. Not convinced it works and not too keen to have my horse ingesting it either!

cbrown
24-12-10, 11:49 PM
I was talking to a rep from a worming company the other day and they told me that so many people knife/shave off the eggs and then leave them on the ground. The scary part is apparently they are still viable on the ground in your paddock. I haven't checked up on this but have no reason to doubt, from now on I'll collect and dispose of the eggs after removal.

jumpingjack
25-12-10, 03:12 PM
I've heard that too CBrown. I do mine out of the paddock in the hope this doesn't happen. No new eggs today - maybe I scared the fly off - or maybe she's just giving me a break for Christmas

Horsesforcourses
25-12-10, 03:55 PM
I scrape as many off as I can with a razor and then rub down with kero - perhaps it's working because there haven't been any botfly eggs for the past year. Could also be weather related or just a small patch of good luck too! Either way I would very much like it to continue.:D

MMC
25-12-10, 09:42 PM
I was talking to a rep from a worming company the other day and they told me that so many people knife/shave off the eggs and then leave them on the ground. The scary part is apparently they are still viable on the ground in your paddock. I haven't checked up on this but have no reason to doubt, from now on I'll collect and dispose of the eggs after removal.

I always thought they needed a warm moist environment to hatch, like a horses stomach. Mind you in Qld at the moment even the ground is warm a moist.

jumpingjack
26-12-10, 10:43 AM
I think they do - so from the ground the horses can still ingest them from the grass and then they hatch in the stomach. Urgh. I hate them

... Taff
26-12-10, 01:55 PM
I just did a Google because I feel that there must be brilliant ideas out there that I haven't yet heard about.

Here's what one said:

Fly predators don't work on bots, unfortunately, and the bot fly doesn't land on your horse to lay the egs, he hovers nearby and deposits them. So, fly sprays don't do much either.

The best tool we've found for removing them is the grooming stone. It's a lightweight, pumice-like stone that does a good job of scraping them off. There's been another thread on this subject recently, and others suggested using a single blade disposable razor. That works, too.

If your bot knife doesn't work, it may not be sharp enough.

I sometimes used a razor blade but that freaks me out a bit in case the unexpected happens. A razor blade is razer sharp, and there are all those grisly, important bits of the horse's legs right under those eggs.


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edelle
26-12-10, 03:48 PM
i asked a vet about using kerosene to kill the eggs...........he said it was a furphy :(

Thanks for that:)

I used to do the kero thing while wondering if it had been proved that it worked

We seem to be lucky these days. I rarely see any.

pplayer
27-12-10, 03:31 PM
I'll definitley give the vinegar a try......mostly because with the mozzies and flies at the moment something has to protect them! Even tried Diazinon wiped on (its a treatment for flyblown sheep) to ease the mozzies, but not with much success. Anyone know if the vinegar will work for biting insects as well as bots?

opensky
28-12-10, 09:36 PM
The pumice grooming stone is the best to get them off. Shake into a plastic bag and tie off and dispose of out of the paddock. When researching worms a few years ago I read of a study where lab technicians with magnifying glasses on actually saw bot eggs hatch from the moisture of their breath passing across the eggs........so they are definitely still viable on the ground or grooming tools. Rgds