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Thread: Colic

  1. #21
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    That's so sad. Things happen so quickly don't they. Vale Girlie.

  2. #22
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    Jul 2010
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    Big hugs, so sorry to hear the outcome , but in our hearts we know they are pain free and will always return as an angel to help us through the days.. xox

  3. #23
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    Jul 2009
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    Very sorry to hear about Girlie.

    You did the right thing and made brave choices. And quickly.

  4. #24
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    Dec 2004
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    Queensland, Australia.
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    Commiserations Flatland , vale Girlie
    The only thing wrong with a horse is that it is usually attached to a human

  5. #25
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    Jul 2007
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    So sorry for your loss flatland. You were onto it and did all that you could, and she has had a good life with you. Small consolation but important. RIP Girlie.
    Without a horse you're half complete.

  6. #26
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    Nov 2006
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    I'm so sorry. Hugs and more hugs and tears.

  7. #27
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    Apr 2004
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    South East Victoria
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    Sorry for your loss flatland. 30 is a good age and you made the right choice. Our oldies need a good life, not an extended one.

    I was saddened yesterday to hear that a lovely 8yo that we sold 3 years ago had a fatal fracture in his leg and the young owner had to pts. It was very sad because their partnership had just started to gel and she had grown in confidence with him. Sad loss all round.


    Quote Originally Posted by ... Taff View Post
    I was thinking the other day about colic and I wondered if anyone had tried, on a horse, what my neighbour apparently did to a young girl in our street some decades ago when she had a severe case of constipation.

    My mother told me about it once.

    "Cinderella Stepson [not her real name] was at the stage of fecal vomitting. She hadn't done so, but the constipation was getting to that stage."

    "What is fecal vomitting?" I asked in horror, hoping I had misunderstood.

    "It's vommiting up fecal matter."

    "Eeeeeuuuugghh..."

    "Mmmmm. Mrs Ryan gave young Cinderella an enema."

    "Of whaat?"

    "Soapy water."

    "And did it work?"

    "Yes. And there was no fecal vomitting."

    That sounded pretty good to me. And it's also non-invasive. Well, it's a bit invasive, yes, but less invasive than a drench orally if the horse is better off not having an oral drench as was my pony. If he'd had an oral drench he might very well have been worse off since nothing at all was getting through.
    Doesn't really work taff unless the vet can reach the constipation by hand. Certainly works with newborn foals - I've given up to 5 enemas to a 2 day old foal that was colicking with constipation from retained meconium but with an adult horse the impaction can be so far into the intestine that enema liquid won't reach. In that case IV therapy (and imho masses of VIT C) are more likely to hydrate the gut. But with horses (and with people of course) when the impaction / constipation is great enough the bowel becomes dehydrated in that location and scars. This causes further impactions and it is a vicious cycle that can repeat over and over.
    "One must avoid using force, for I have never seen anything positive come out of a horse if such is the case".

    Antoine De Pluvinel

  8. #28
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    Feb 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bats_79 View Post




    Doesn't really work taff unless the vet can reach the constipation by hand. Certainly works with newborn foals - I've given up to 5 enemas to a 2 day old foal that was colicking with constipation from retained meconium but with an adult horse the impaction can be so far into the intestine that enema liquid won't reach. In that case IV therapy (and imho masses of VIT C) are more likely to hydrate the gut. But with horses (and with people of course) when the impaction / constipation is great enough the bowel becomes dehydrated in that location and scars. This causes further impactions and it is a vicious cycle that can repeat over and over.
    That's exactly what my vet said. I did ask because I thought it might be worth a try.

  9. #29
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    Ah. That explains why I've never read or heard of the practise in horses.

  10. #30
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    Jindera, NSW, Australia.
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    Sorry to hear that you lost your old girl flatland. Colic is a nasty thing and you can be lucky or unlucky with the treatment in some cases. It sounds like you made the best choice for your girl.

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