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  1. #11
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    Aug 2007
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    Queensland, Australia.
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    Well people can get horses that are unsuitable for them, doesn't mean it's the fault of the breed. My WBs are awesome, maybe I just got lucky 4 times? Well five if you count the one I went halves in IME the best thing to do is look into the lines, talk to people who have horses with the same breeding, make sure the traits common in a line match what is wanted, we have breeds because we want to predict the traits over generations, make the most of that. I have seen some people buy unsuitable horses because of the price, might have fancy breeding or not but if it's not the right fit it's not the right fit, sometimes it's better to save a bit longer to get what you really want and is best for you.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    1,906

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    Quote Originally Posted by tgh05 View Post
    If owning a horse who may be too smart( quick thinking) for the rider does not excite, , you could also try for a pre or derivative, a worthy second choice
    Well there's a nice "put down." I have pure and pb PRE's and none lack in the brain department, as for smarts, it's obvious you've not spent too much time in their company.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
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    6,010

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    I know that is your sense of humour Teegs.

    I will play

    I used to love Arabians the ones with good bone and brains who had the same characteristics of good horses everywhere. I still do think they are amazing, smart, strong and loyal.

    then the 80"s happened and people started breeding halter horses...stupidly extruded, impractical horses to my mind. About this time just about every pony club horse had a dollop of Arabian and some worked some didn't. Neither extreme appealed to me.

    Over the years I have had Arabians, Warmbloods, Warmblood x Andalusian, Iberian, TB etc

    The Iberian (Andalusian and Lusitano) have a lovely fire, smarts and flamboyance that the Arabian has. Both are versatile and hardy. Both can certainly be hot as hades and reactive. The Iberians simply appeal to me more.


    Gasbuster...I PM'd You
    For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, who art as black as hell, as dark as night...

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia.
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    5,296

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    Quote Originally Posted by FNQ62 View Post
    Well there's a nice "put down." I have pure and pb PRE's and none lack in the brain department, as for smarts, it's obvious you've not spent too much time in their company.
    sensitive much ?

    What did you want me to say.. what you say?.. that would be useful.

    Some Arabians are altogether too smart for their own good.. too sharp and opinionated for a discipline like dressage where total obedience is mandated.

    I have ridden and worked with Andalusians and like the breed..sheesh….

    posted from NEWPORT RHODE ISLAND… :-)
    The only thing wrong with a horse is that it is usually attached to a human

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    1,906

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    No, just giving back what you gave out....I've had both breeds, and both react to how they're treated. If you want powder kegs, then that's what you'll reap, in fact that pretty much covers all breeds. A good horse, is still a good horse no matter colour or breed, I just hate it when people say one is better than the other. Now if we're going to talk about having the horse to do the job required, that's a different ball game.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    South East Victoria
    Posts
    10,032

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    There is NO breed of horse more suited to dressage than another.

    Dressage is for the horse NOT the horse for dressage.

    All that matters is what you want from the dressage and then what size, age and type of horse you want and the budget you will spend on it.

    I have 3 x 3yo fillies & 3 x 3yo colts for sale this year. The prices range from $5000 to $35,000. The heights from 15.3hh to 17.1hh. All are suitable for dressage, some will find working equitation a breeze and some will shine in the eventing or show hunter field as well.

    All show characteristics inherited from their Holsteiner, TB, Arabian and Neopolitan ancestors and as FNQ has said, all will reflect how you manage them. However non are super reactive (thank God because I'm not interested in managing horses like that on a daily basis) hence we could do the whipper snippering with the new unit beside the yards when the colts were being fed and they all just kept eating.
    "One must avoid using force, for I have never seen anything positive come out of a horse if such is the case".

    Antoine De Pluvinel

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    South East Victoria
    Posts
    10,032

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    Are you really in Rhode Island or are you just testing to see who reads your posts to the end?
    "One must avoid using force, for I have never seen anything positive come out of a horse if such is the case".

    Antoine De Pluvinel

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    South East Victoria
    Posts
    10,032

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    Message me via Facebook with your budget - I might know of a horse that is suitable.

    https://www.facebook.com/Louise.vG1


    I thought this post might fit in with this thread......


    "One must avoid using force, for I have never seen anything positive come out of a horse if such is the case".

    Antoine De Pluvinel

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    sydney, nsw, australia.
    Posts
    12,733

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bats_79 View Post
    There is NO breed of horse more suited to dressage than another.

    Dressage is for the horse NOT the horse for dressage.

    All that matters is what you want from the dressage and then what size, age and type of horse you want and the budget you will spend on it.

    I have 3 x 3yo fillies & 3 x 3yo colts for sale this year. The prices range from $5000 to $35,000. The heights from 15.3hh to 17.1hh. All are suitable for dressage, some will find working equitation a breeze and some will shine in the eventing or show hunter field as well.

    All show characteristics inherited from their Holsteiner, TB, Arabian and Neopolitan ancestors and as FNQ has said, all will reflect how you manage them. However non are super reactive (thank God because I'm not interested in managing horses like that on a daily basis) hence we could do the whipper snippering with the new unit beside the yards when the colts were being fed and they all just kept eating.
    Dressage is not restricted to horses either, I have a book dated in the 1800's that includes instructions for dressage for camels

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    sydney, nsw, australia.
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    12,733

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    Quote Originally Posted by teetee View Post
    The Arabian breed (by and large) is not what they once were. Neither is the TB so I would hesitate to recommend an anglo these days unless I knew the horse personally. WBs come in a lot of different shapes and sizes, with different strengths and weaknesses. For sure if you're looking for a horse you look at the horse first and breed second but going from TBs to WBs I know which ones are better built for the task, and find the work easier. But of course I can only speak to my own experience but in my experience it's not fashion, it's just breeding for different purposes.
    there still are the originals that are entirely suitable but they are not fashionable and although I have about ten represetatives of that kind, including a 3 year old Cudglebar colt bred by les ellery, he would sire awesome anglos, and my aeneas descendants the only potential buyers want to take em to some rides and onsell em to dubai so they play in the paddocks until I can find them pony club homes. the lines will be pretty much extinct by the end of their generation.

    selecting for the show ring with its emphasis on exaggeration and "animation" has unconsciously selected for high strung which the arabian never was. As Lady Anne commented when she went looking to buy in arabia to commence Crabbet Park.
    when the entered the camp of the seller there wasnt a single horse in sight with its head up and its tail up showing off. only until they were mounted did the head go up and the tail flag the horses she had seen in town being ridden and realised how relaxed they were until wanted.
    the showring wants to see that all the time.
    Last edited by mindari; 14-10-17 at 09:53 AM.

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