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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    Brisbane Queenzealand
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    I hear Yarra Valley is very short of decent farriers too. Midders where she is? Maybe a shortage all round in Vic?

    Just a thought, perhaps living expenses have exceeded achievable prices?

    Just as a comparison, in the US where there are comparable house prices, farrier prices are at least double what they are here.

    Around Melbourne, at $150-170 a set is way too cheap and not a good nett income compared to living expenses.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia.
    Posts
    5,320

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    Just for interest sake .. how long should a farrier take to shoe a nag ? …...not asking the op, asking the customers…. :-)

    What do y'all think the job is worth ?

    I have heard all the consultation waffle about see the nag trot out, watch the gait etc etc .. doesn't happen.

    Mostly they are in the gate slam bam thank you ma'am.. and gone…. maybe for the going money thats what has to happen.
    The only thing wrong with a horse is that it is usually attached to a human

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    5,700

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    Yes - west of Melbourne.

    I have been paying $120 a set. I don't know if it's money caused my two excellent farriers to dump me (one by one) - I have top facilities, am always nice, offer coffee, water, beer - horses are good to do and I never ever never criticise their work or anybody else's. But they have gone to the racehorse trainers and the big vet clinic. Can't blame them really. They have never asked for more money, upped their fees. I would happily pay more to bring them back. sniffle. Cos they're worth it.

    They come in their little truck with a gas bottle and forge etc. on the back and take an hour or thereabouts and that's fine. It takes as long as it takes, surely. They remove old shoes, trim, take some new shoes out of a packet and place them against the feet while forge is heating up, then they throw the shoes in the forge - have a smoko or check the race results on their phone - pull out the shoes and lay them on the feet, smoke everywhere, then re-shape as necessary. Cold water and then bevel the shoes then put them on and tidy up. Bob's your uncle. If necessary, if there's a problem, if there's a doubt, yes, they will ask to see the horse trot out.

    Agree that $120 an hour that doesn't include travelling time is not great. The racing stables and vet clinic probably pay the same but there's no travelling and putting your gear back in the truck etc.

    Then of course there are other farriers who charge the same - $120 - but whip off the old shoes, trim, bung the old shoes back on even if there's no toe left and if it doesn't look quite right, take a bit more foot off - bob's your uncle. Half an hour max.

    Some of us have been left with nowhere to go.
    Last edited by midnightly; 10-01-18 at 06:42 PM.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Queensland, Australia.
    Posts
    5,869

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    I haven’t found time taken to really correlate with the effectiveness of the job.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    1,908

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    Don't forget Midnight this is 74kms on a Qld country round, flat and easy drive, not 74kms of built up area, no traffic nor traffic lights. As I said, am playing Russian Roulette with the local farriers - unfortunately my poor neds are having to be the guinea pigs. As for the vets, there are others in the area who are not buying into the Hendra bullying tactics, so I'll use them.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    1,147

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    Quote Originally Posted by tgh05 View Post
    West of Melbourne

    must be an astronomical anomaly

    a farrier black hole….
    Don't know tgh, if it is just this area. It is a poorer area compared to the east and quite a few trotting trainers, so earnings may be lower. The biggest problem is that most are older and are winding back, very few young people training to be farrier, at least around here.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    144

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    Interesting discussion, thanks Shoeman.

    I pay $140 for cold shoeing (new set) and can often get a refit of the original shoes, as mine are reshod every 3-4 weeks, depending on the season.

    My farrier has his forge at home, and he patterns each horse prior to shoeing, so each set is individually made up for the horse. Not sure of his quals - I know he's listed on VRC but he was recommended to me many years ago, by an equally fussy friend and I'm more than happy with his work.

    Despite my confidence in my farrier, I will never let him shoe or trim any of my horses without someone being there. I think there's only been one or maybe two times I've had my OH hold a horse, when I've been unable to get home, but my farrier knows he can't attend to a horse without someone there. Like Midnightly, I have an ideal set up for my farrier, as I want to keep him coming.

    I've been lucky over the years to have kept farriers long term - changed only when we've moved to different parts of the state.

    I have also used a farrier who had no formal qualifications, but he was a real horseman and my horses never displayed any reaction to his shoeing.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia.
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    5,320

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    horses never displayed any reaction to his shoeing.

    This is arguably the nub of the shoe gods spiel.. that he and others are more able to detect and deal with deviations than the average blacksmith.
    Problem is that , like many things we do with nags, there is very limited anecdotal evidence and none across a decent sample.
    An individual may react positively to a change , but twenty others would demonstrate no palpable reaction.

    Managing nags is really a black art and the older I get the more difficult it is to explain why I do stuff a certain way...
    The only thing wrong with a horse is that it is usually attached to a human

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Brisbane Queenzealand
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    1,794

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    I probably to at least 3/4 of my book either alone or without a holder, just tied up and owner off doing something else.

    But I've built that trust over time, and if there is a problem, I stop and get someone.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    144

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    Quote Originally Posted by ShoeMan View Post
    I probably to at least 3/4 of my book either alone or without a holder, just tied up and owner off doing something else.

    But I've built that trust over time, and if there is a problem, I stop and get someone.

    Just to clarify, my practice of being present when the farrier is working, is not based on trust, or lack of trust.

    I take a real interest in the process, and often ask questions relative to something I see on a foot, or concerns I may have.

    The driving factor with me is based on previous experience ...... as we are a little remote, there is no-one around if 'something' happens to the farrier and he needs help. Having personally been involved (professionally) with 2 incidents where farriers were alone with clients horses, it is a risk I won't take, and none of my farriers have ever taken issue with it.

    And I actually really like my farrier, and enjoy catching up with him. If he has time, we often enjoy cake and coffee after his work is done.

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