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  1. #21
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    Jul 2009
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    Oh I don't know, Zamarie. I said that the riders at the clinic (not necessarily known as our "top" riders) would be able to tell if their horse came behind the bit. I was a little disappointed that Bats inferred that they didn't - that they mistook "light" with "behind the bit".

    It's a horrible feeling when he comes behind the bit - you completely lose control of everything because without willingness to go forward you have nothing. Very easy to tell once you've been in the saddle for a few years.

    Sounds as though Pedro was really really good. Delighted to hear it - call it what you will but how lovely to have such an empathetic guest.

  2. #22
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    Apr 2004
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    There will always be disagreements between people about who is teaching and or riding the best, or the most classically.

    The riders at this Masterclass may, or may not have recognised the issues that their horses had before Pedro rode them. They might have been searching for answers and he gave them those, or maybe they already know what to do but they didn't get the chance because Pedro took over the ride. I don't know, I'm just saying how the horse went when it was presented to him to ride.

    The only horse I "know" is the grey stallion. Roger Fitzharding talks about the horse needing to put the neck down but he is totally missing what Pedro had the horse actually do. The horse was dropped in the thoracic sling and high with the head, the connection from the neck through the shoulders and abdomen to the hindleg was lost. So Pedro got the wither to lift and the neck to go forward more (which is also lower). He opened up the horse's gullet and freed the hindleg. The result was wonderful.

    But when the rider got the horse back and rode him for the international judge in the demo in the afternoon, she rode exactly the same way as she had before. As though Pedro had never been on the horse. I know which ride I preferred, and I know which person I would have lessons from and which one I wouldn't bother with. That's all that matters to me.
    "One must avoid using force, for I have never seen anything positive come out of a horse if such is the case".

    Antoine De Pluvinel

  3. #23
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    Sounds like a very interesting format.. wish I could have been there. I don’t have a clue who the grey horse was/is. You don’t have to tell me.

    Who was the international judge and how did he/she mark him? That would be the interesting part. Must have been terribly disappointing/frustrating for Pedro to see him back the way he was. Was he up to the GP work?

  4. #24
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    Apr 2004
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    South East Victoria
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    Peter Storr was the judge. Heather Currie and Istan were horse and rider

    https://www.facebook.com/leesa.carso...2126255287968/


    Pedro Torres

    https://www.facebook.com/heather.cur...type=3&theater
    Last edited by Bats_79; 23-11-18 at 11:47 AM.
    "One must avoid using force, for I have never seen anything positive come out of a horse if such is the case".

    Antoine De Pluvinel

  5. #25
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    Jan 1970
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    Thanks for posting those Bats. I kind of thought that all this would make a bit of a change but after speaking to people both at Equitana and the WE clinics maybe its still another few years away

  6. #26
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    Jul 2009
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    Thanks Bats. See what you mean. Super horse though!

    The only thing that will bring about change is the judging Zamarie. It’s all very well for people to train their horses classically (I give in) and not compete but that’s not going to change anything. Mutterings on Facebook notwithstanding.

    If all the dressage judges in the world got together and agreed NOT to award a mark over 6 or maybe 7 in extreme cases to horses jammed at the gullet and broken in the neck we might get somewhere. The difficulty is that some of them do know and do understand but because it’s *insert famous rider* and they know that they boss judge of all the world has said “you must judge the quality” they stick their heads in the sand and do as they’re told.

    The grey horse was so much nicer when he was allowed to show how wonderful he is (by Pedro) but you betcha that there will be less experienced dressage judges saying “hollow” and “above the bit” and mark the “other grey horse” much higher.

    That’s what has to change.

  7. #27
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    I had the fortune of watching Pedro ride the horses at the selection day (including my own) before the masterclass, where he didn't have to explain to an audience what he was doing, just solely concentrate on what he was doing. He did ride the horses differently to their own riders and changed their way of going. The way Bats describes it. He did smile a lot and you could tell when he was happy with each little try from the horses. My interactions with him were great, he was very encouraging and kind.
    I'm not saying he's better than any other professional or worse, i'm just giving my impression of my experience at Equitana.

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