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Thread: Feeding Lime

  1. #1
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    Central Coast, NSW
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    Default Feeding Lime

    Why do some people feed lime to their horses? Is it because the pasture lacks something? Any known side-effects?
    Cheers
    PIAS

  2. #2
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    Ballarat, Victoria, Australia.
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    There's agricultural limestone & gardening lime which is a very white powder that burns & sterilises. Gardeners use it in the winter on their dug up veggie patches, so don't use this!!
    Aggy lime is a biscuity colour consisting of a high degree of calcium which young animals/humans need to grow/lay down healthy bone.

  3. #3
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    Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
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    Down here on the South Coast our grass is calcium deficient.

    Anecdotal evidence suggests the old breeders from the area used to send their mares up to the Southern Highlands claiming it made a hand's difference in the grown of the foal...Now that I think about it the places I have heard mentioned were all in limestone country...Bungonia etc

    Might be something in that

    Anubis
    For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, who art as black as hell, as dark as night...

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gdh View Post
    There's agricultural limestone & gardening lime which is a very white powder that burns & sterilises. Gardeners use it in the winter on their dug up veggie patches, so don't use this!!
    Aggy lime is a biscuity colour consisting of a high degree of calcium which young animals/humans need to grow/lay down healthy bone.
    far as i know there is no place in australia you can legally buy quicklime which is what you are referring too.

    the only lime you can buy is "hydrated lime" and its perfectly white and you can feed it out by the handfull. chuck it on the paddock by the buckeload with no harm whatsoever. also chucked on to wounds its cleans and steralises without burning saw a wild mare with a horrible cuts to her pastern, the guy threw handfulls of hydrated lime at her leg till it was smothered in the stuff, the minute he spotted any ooze chucked on more. didnt want to risk a kick in the head. 3 weeks later off fell the lime crust and perfectly healed. never knew that one before, seen stockholm tar used the same way but that horse was tame and barry rose painted it on, in the case she had torn 3 x 4 inches of skin off a leg, yuk


    quicklime has been banned from sale for decades due to the fact it blinded hundreds if not thousands of people and children in the past. both the dust and the wash it was used for to whitwash walls and fences, ie as in tom sawyer painting aunt pollys fence.

  5. #5
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    hydrated lime is called limal, or brickies lime can be bought from any hardware or gardening supply. It is NOT spread on paddocks except to sterilize an area. It can be used on wounds to dry and steralize too.

    Agricultural lime is for raising the ph in the ground and improving pasture.

    DCP is the best, most absorbable form of calcium to feed to livestock. This is Di Calcium Phosphate (calcium monohydrogen phosphate) and it contains about 22% calcium and 18% phosphorus. I'm pretty sure it is the basis for most mineral supplements.
    Brokeford Holsteiners - video and pictures - www.brokeford.com.au

  6. #6
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    ...yes, but not very easily digestible.

    For my youngstock I've always fed milk powder (as in calf replacer). For my adults I feed dolomite.

  7. #7
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    my favourite use for it is to deodarise urine areas. flies wont go near it and gets rid of the smell.

    havnt noticed it affect any grass it lands on?

  8. #8
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    We feed our lot dolomite!! I was told by my grandad to throw Garden Lime(F70) on to wounds. Especially wounds of the leg or wounds showing bone. In the first instance it stops proud flesh from forming, deodorizes the wound hence no fly strike.

    In the second instance to cover bone with lime is the best way to stop the bone from drying out. Dampen first then apply lime to cover bone and flesh(leave open to air) you can redo any number of times per day!


    Hydrated lime burns the healthy flesh away as well as the pround flesh. Much too strong to use on human or animal.

    You can put a table spoon in water ( bath tub) tub to lower the PH of the water (makes it soft) I'm told it makes it more Palatable and helps to remove unwanted bugs!!
    Jodi & Geoff

    http://www.wickwoodarabians.com

    Breeders of Performance Arabians

  9. #9
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    DCP is the lime that you feed to horses, it's perfectly safe (oh, unless it's called lime and in hay cubes, then it's going to poison your horses according to some LOL)

  10. #10
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    Ag Lime is Calcium Carbonate - perfectly safe to feed to livestock
    DCP is (as the initials sound) Di Calcium Phosphate - also perfectly safe for livestock and according to JK & other equine nutritionists, the most easily bio available source of calcium & phosphorus (which is why it is used in most supplements).

    Together these 2 minerals are the best source of supplementary calcium you can give your horse.

    Dolomite, while it is highly recommended by many 'natural therapists' is not so good for horses as the calcium & magnesium in it are not very 'bio-available' (about 2% I believe) so very large amounts need to be fed to obtain the same level of supplementation.
    This can cause intestinal problems.

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