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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
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    Western Australia, Erm.... Australia.
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    Question Asymmetrical Pelvis in Young Horses

    Same questions as for my Jumpers Bump.... Dying to know.

    1. Does it cause problems?
    2. Am I the only one who questions photos on the 'net that have horses standing crooked, and then say they have an asymmetrical pelvis???
    3. What problems CAN it cause in hind lameness?
    4. What have you done about it, and what worked for you?
    5. Is it worth carrying on in most cases with a horse who has an AP?
    6. How is it separate from Sacroiliac problems?
    There is not one real reason life should be taken seriously!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Western Vic
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    Wouldn't purchase a young horse with an AP for ANY sort of performance - why buy into possible problems?

    If the horse also has a long coupling (more than 3 fingers fit between last rib and hip) that compounds the likelihood of problems as the hindquarter is likely to 'trail behind' and further put stress on the AP.

    Inevitably tied to sacroiliac problems and these are difficult to diagnose/treat/beat.

    Always wise to take pics from directly behind the horse (stood up properly square on level surface) - go home, draw lines from hip to hip and look for level.

    Regards
    Without a horse you're half complete.

  3. #3
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    Jul 2007
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    Western Vic
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    DB these are 2 interesting articles - one on current research (what there is of it!) into asymmetrical pelvises in racehorses (confirms that it is either no issue at all or, if significant (visible) asymmetry then does compromise performance)

    http://www.trainermagazine.com/europe/news/55

    And just for interest ........ this one is on an exhumed Arabian mare put down as a 12 yo, whose skeleton 20 years later provided some interesting facts (how consecutive years of foal-carrying - from the age of 4 - affected the pelvis/spine) Fascinating reading on function affecting form and vice-versa.

    http://www.agecroft.com.au/khanbalique.htm

    Regards
    Last edited by opensky; 13-03-10 at 10:18 PM. Reason: typo
    Without a horse you're half complete.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    country SA
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    so if the pelvis is asymmetrical, are the tendons and ligaments attached symmetrically or asymmetrically,
    if the pelvis is asymmetrical, are the joints and articulations symmetric or asymmetric,
    would you drive a car with wheels asymmetric and expect normal wear and tear, would it remain safe and sound over time?

    PS
    is an asymmetric pelvis a beneficial genetic trait to pass on?
    '..his neigh is like the bidding of a monarch and his countenance enforces homage.'
    Shakespeare

  5. #5
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    Obviously no and no Harriette.........but there is enlightenment in the discussion of the issues....Regards
    Without a horse you're half complete.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    "There are to date very few scientific reports on the frequency of hindquarter asymmetries in the horse, although Bathe (2002) found that most hard working horses were likely to have some degree of pelvic asymmetry. This factor may not always affect performance, as many successful horses have been found to have asymmetry of the pelvis."

    Straight out of your article, Opensky. One of the reasons I asked for loads of personal experience. I am of the opinion that it is more rare to fiind a SYMMETRICAL horse or human, and I wanted feedback on your experiences with them - as with you - you say don't buy it but you had one and had no problems.

    Horses of exceptional quality are pretty thin on the ground, and when you find an exceptional individual that has 99.9% of what you want, but has asymmetrical pelvis at 3yo, do you buy it? This is part of the research I am doing. A second vet opinion is also being sought.

    Vet checks don't measure the pelvis, they look at it, and look at the horse working. I am deeply suspicious of most vet's horse handling skills, and a lot of what they say has to do with how well the horse moves when they request some type of demo. They don't like the owner doing it, or the purchaser, so you are stuck with a dodgy request, therefore a dodgy eport from the vet. It's a wonder the poor bloody thing can still walk after the flexion tests they gave it! They were unsure of one stifle, so flexioned it for what seemed like an age. My legs hurt watching.....
    There is not one real reason life should be taken seriously!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    2,324

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    My question is why would the horse have an asymmetrical pelvis?

    Is it just muscle or the whole pelvis?

    In my very limited thoughts, if it is the whole pelvis it would be to due serious injury. As a potential jumper or dressage I wouldn't touch it.

    There are some things that you get around but an injured pelvis is one that will cause you much heart ache.

    Just my opinion.

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    I know of a horse that had a fracture in the pelvis (somewhere in there). I pointed out to the owner that the horse's pelvis now looked lopsided from behind (looked asymmetrical).

    With box rest and lots of painkillers the fracture healed. I moved not long after so don't know if he was sound for riding (it didn't matter he was old so would have been retired if need be).

    I think first, I'd want to get the horse checked over to see if it is a conformation fault or due to injury. If it is due to an injury (which has healed) such as the horse above, there could be a lot of muscle wastage. It might just be a matter of addressing that issue with appropriate excercises to build and strenghten up those muscles.

    I can't comment on a conformational fault as I've never had a horse with this issue.

  9. #9
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    DB No need to take my head off. Maybe not intended but tone reads that way to me. Only offering a reply. Yes, I had one with no problems, I was lucky but horse had exceptional conformation in every other regard, which is a consideration too. I know sj'ers who have had them with varying degrees of problems from occasional to chronic. Costly, disappointing and always the worry of a recurrence once issues arise.

    Lots of factors come into the equation: Amount the horse is competed; consideration for the season- hard ground; amount the horse is 'conditioned' properly prior to competition - regular work to keep hq muscles toned; heights the horse is facing; plus rider's seat/skill. Would be similar for dressage, eventing, racing.

    I would only ever use an Equine vet for something this specific, because yes, I agree many vets are not knowlegeable with such matters, goes without saying.

    If looking at a young horse and I had the option of one with AP and one without, the choice would be easy. If you have found one that you like 99.9% everything else ticks the boxes you want then go ahead. You are making a decision at least knowing the facts.

    Better to see the animal in light-on condition as the pelvic construction is easier to see than see a fat rump that hides the structure. Just an added hint, but of course that may not be possible.

    FYI most vets around my area now refuse to do Vet Checks because they are liable or being harassed by parties who were not happy with their outcomes.

    Good luck with your decision. Regards
    Without a horse you're half complete.

  10. #10
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    Western Vic
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    BTW for general interest on this topic, some people confuse a Jumper/Hunters Bump with a Goose Rump.

    The difference is that a Jumper/Hunters Bump has a high-set tail, a Goose Rump has a low-set tail.

    Jumper/hunters Bump MAY or may not cause problems.

    Both have a high croup, the Goose Rump has a steep croup, shorter muscling (less ability to swing legs back) and the low set tail (used to be a sign of more lowly breeding).

    Regards
    Without a horse you're half complete.

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