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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Central Coast , NSW, Australia.
    Posts
    708

    Question Horse paws the ground while tied - what to do?

    Hi All,

    Is there a simple way to cure this bad habit? She also does it in the float when it is stationary.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
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    .
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    5,008

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    Hobbles, although probably not a good idea in the float . Can she be distracted by a hay net or something?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Pointy end of Australia
    Posts
    5,692

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    Drive like a F1 driver Make sure to really jump on the brakes frequently.
    They'll be too busy trying to stand upright










    ....I am joking!
    Although I have seen some people towing floats who are Andretti wannnabees

    The horse is God's gift to mankind. ~Arabian Proverb

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    8,279

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    Slamming on the brakes in the float is the quickest way to create a panicky scrambler. Joke or no joke, don't EVER do it, please!

    Ours often get impatient when tied up in the breezeway in the barn, which is concreted. Impatient or bored horses paw. So I got a big square of rubber split belting and put it down at the tie-up spot, so that if they do paw, they only paw the rubber, and don't give themselves a wonky hoof trim on the concrete. You can also put it outside, and fix it around a hitching post if necessary. The only thing to watch is if it gets wet - it can be surprisingly slippery, even if it isn't really smooth... so be careful.

    I've been known to toss a brush or a rubber mit at a pawing horse, while sternly saying "NO!" or "Uhhhh!" They know it's naughty, and do it to get attention. Tennis balls are also quite useful - but you have to pick 'em all up afterwards!

    Don't hobble. And never, ever, hobble on concrete. 'Saab's grandsire broke his leg when he was hobbled on concrete and fell down. A tragic end to a beautiful imported Arabian stallion - El Sherif Nazir.
    "God forbid that I should go to any Heaven in which there are no horses"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NSW, Australia.
    Posts
    1,478

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    Hobbles and the sharp braking works for me

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Ballarat, Victoria, Australia.
    Posts
    4,161

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    Sharp breaking's pretty ineffective if she only paws in a stationary float .

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    .
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    555

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    My horse paws like crazy when in the float, mainly when stationary. Doesn’t do it when tied up though. My instructor has suggested putting on hobbles which attach to all 4 legs. How it works is if they go to paw it picks up their hind leg. It gets put on in a round yard first and eventually you can put it on them in the float once they are used to it. He has solved many pawers with this. I just have to get my butt into gear and actually do it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Jindera NSW
    Posts
    2,615

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    This can actually be a bit of a complicated problem. It can be from a few causes, and depending how ingrained it is can be a difficult cycle to break.

    I have had success with hobbles, but of course sufficient preparation is necessary.
    I would not hobble a horse on a float though.

    Keeping them occupied may help for tying. But I doubt this will help with anticipation or nevousness on the float.

    Does the horse comes off the float like a fire cracker? Sometimes the two can be linked. As the horse may be anticipating coming off.

    Lots of good suggestions so far.
    Sometimes you may just have to tie them up for a few hours, until they 'get over it'.
    Really though you will just have to find the solution that works best for your horse, which may be a bit easier if you can find out the cause whether it be boredom, anxiety, nervousness.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Jindera NSW
    Posts
    2,615

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    Quote Originally Posted by jersey_cow View Post
    My horse paws like crazy when in the float, mainly when stationary. Doesn’t do it when tied up though. My instructor has suggested putting on hobbles which attach to all 4 legs. How it works is if they go to paw it picks up their hind leg. It gets put on in a round yard first and eventually you can put it on them in the float once they are used to it. He has solved many pawers with this. I just have to get my butt into gear and actually do it.
    This sort of hobbling and hobble training, is the most dangerous, and can go pair shaped very quickly. For someone who is not experienced (not saying you arn't JC) I would definately be getting professional help before trying this one.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Gladstone, QLD
    Posts
    3,559

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    I put the car in park, get out and walk around to the float door open it and say "excuse me!" in a loud teacher-y way.

    I think they forget their manners when they think we aren't watching.

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