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View Full Version : Tranquilizer/sedative to assist full body clip a horse- advice please



lalique
27-08-12, 09:00 PM
I have to clip out a friends horse who, to put it mildly, is a psycho lunatic to clip out.

Each year she gets a Vet to sedate the "fiend" but the Vet never seems to get it right and we end up with complications, nothing of a fatal type, but it is not satisfactory either. I swore last year that I woudl defintely not clip the beast again, but as usual no one else will touch him and she is pressuring me to do it.

Last year the Vet used a mix of ACP and Valium and he came out of it after approx 30 minutes

I do not want to personally administer anything, but I would like a few suggestions to put to the Vet as I am tired of this being a traumatic experience to both horse and humans

I do not need a lecture on how to go about desensitizing the horse as he tolerates regular trims, but the belly, poll/ear areas around the head are strictly off limits. He is a big horse and is seriously agressive and dangerous when you full clip him (think knee cap you or take the top off your skull, he means business)

Any personal first hand experience on actual meds would be appreciated, sorry but I am not after second hand hear say stories as I cant afford to be clobbered

tgh05
27-08-12, 09:32 PM
sorry lalique.. I know you don't want an rgument.. but it is cbh.. :-)

I would clip the nag without sedatives..

The horse behaviour is what humans are allowing , all the rest is just excuses for insufficient training/discipline

anyway.. you don't want this answer.. many don't ...so I'm sure you will get lots of input on doping the nag...

mrsgg
27-08-12, 10:35 PM
what if you do the clip over two days? clip the parts that he'll allow with out the sedative and then clip the other bits whilst he's 'under' with the vet there.... and wear a helmet and xc safety vest. Or tell your friend to put him under lights and some elbow grease to brush out his winter coat.

LindaH
27-08-12, 10:47 PM
I'm not up on all the drugs for tranquilising. I do know that they will startle out of ACE, as my OH well knows after he was kicked by an ace treated horse while clipping. Maybe discuss other options with your vet, and try to get a second opinion from a vet who works with horses a lot. I'm sure my vet would have some opinions, his name is Michael and you can find him at the Narrabri Vet clinic (only vet clinic in town :D). I seem to recall some people mentioning Rompen (or something like that ???).

Louise_M
27-08-12, 10:54 PM
Tell her to stick him in a stable with lights and wait two months. I don't see why you should endanger yourself because of someone else's training failures.

Hope she's at least paying you danger money.

Cleveland
27-08-12, 10:56 PM
I have no probs with doping a horse for the safety of the little person on the ground. My horse is a nightmare to clip, he is extremely sensitive to noise, think starting up the farriers forge, the new farriers grinder, some hissing of high pressure hoses, and clippers near him he totally goes off his head. I have tried to desensitise numerous times and while he is much better with the hose and forge, clippers are one of those things i have given up the fight with.

We tried to clip him last year, cant even remember the concoction the vet gave us (designed for a big horse with big flight.fight response) and it didn't even take the edge off. I ended up saying forget it, ill live with him hairy. I don't believe its as easy as saying its bad training just dont let them do it... lol... if only it were that simple. Sounds like people have never had a horse trying to take their head off whilst clipping, my horse isnt a nasty horse at all, he is genuinely terrified of some noises, will try his hardest to flee and when he cant his only self defense response to the pressure is to lash out. When it gets to an out of control level of fight/flight and real risk of human injury/death why even risk it?

Sorry i cant help with drug suggestions, i cant remember what we used, save to say it was no where near enough he could have had x3 the amount and still be kicking.
If you cant safely sedate him to the kind of level you need without risking him/you i would bow out gracefully, not worth risking yourself... unless you want to give him a general and just roll him from side to side.... :)

Edited to add, we didnt bother to even try ACE, no where near strong enough we had an IV mix, and ACE can make them sweat.

MMC
27-08-12, 11:02 PM
Aren't they much more likely to sweat under sedation? One of the last things you want when clipping is a sweaty horse? And no offence, a has been said an unpredictable horse? Sedation insn't perfect and often won't last as long as you need to properly clip a big horse.

Vets also aren't perfect at gauging the sedation a horse needs. And sometimes they get it wrong.

We had a vet practice that would always hugely overestimate the weight of our 10hh pony and often would have her on the ground just to do her teeth. And then, charge me for the extra time they had to hang around to make sure she was still breathing.

For the record, now we live on a cattle property and have scales, she weighs about 185kgs. The vets had her guesstimated up to 300kgs. That's a big diffference in drugs. :( :( (Now I have cattle I can tell 200 kgs from 300, shouldn't a vet be able to also. :( )

Lights in the stable from much earlier than now may be a better option that going through this stress?



Is he really that hairy still, now that Spring will spring next week. Are you better with a Furminator and a sh!t load of elbow grease?

bintherewonthat
27-08-12, 11:27 PM
Sheesh... sometimes people make a simple job a life long ambition...

Good on you Lalique! Stick to your guns - or clipper blades! Just give him some ACE, and have another hit handy in case .. If you worry about the needle try sedazine, but it's more time delayed and harder to judge. Forge thru, he's just really sensitive (or maybe HE IS NORMAL! What sort of nut of a horse stands still while you drag fire breathing dragon blades across his body?) There are lots of things that we must do for horses that they HATE but that we know are better for them in this modern world.

You sound like your doing the best you can. Good for you.

I love it about the desensitizing... Sure desensitize me to heights... to the dentist drill, to an MRI when my whole body MUST remain motionless arhh... NO THANKS ... I know it's good for me, I have a rational mind, but please, just wake me up when it's over!

Not every horse can cope with every outlandish, unnatural human desire or activity. There is no doubt a horse in regular work at this time of year is better off, healthy then a shaggy, sweaty, itchy fluff ball! Dope him, get his coat off... Your horse will thank you for it!

Bintherewonthat

TopClass
27-08-12, 11:41 PM
I will not clip a horse on ACE not only can they startle out of it and kick through it but they sweat like crazy! If she is that desperate for a clip keep the vet on hand for the entire clip, do the head, belly and legs first, that way at least you are not so much in the danger zone if he does snap out of it. My favourite sedation is a concoction of Domosedan and another which I'm sorry I can't recall, they never sweat and stay under for at least 45 minutes and dopey enough to touch up with trimmers.

Edited to add I prefer not to sedate horses, out of the 136 I have clipped this year only three have been sedated, the sedation used was a mixture and none of the horses had their head on the ground, though I did one last year which had been sedated for the dentist and she totally out of it! But also sweating so it was a different sedation to what is usually used around my area (perhaps they all used the same vet?) If my own horse required sedation due to being dangerous I would not clip him.

bintherewonthat
28-08-12, 12:35 AM
Dormosedan, a non-narcotic sedative and analgesic, is a potent α2-adrenoceptor agonist which produces sedation and superficial and visceral analgesia which is dose dependent in its depth and duration. Profound lethargy and a characteristic lowering of the head with reduced sensitivity to environmental stimuli (sounds, etc.) are seen with detomidine. A short period of incoordination is characteristically followed by immobility and a firm stance with front legs well spread. ***Sensitivity to touch is little affected and in some cases may actually be enhanced.***

Note To Users

***Some horses, although apparently deeply sedated, may still respond to external stimuli. Routine safety measures should be employed to protect practitioners and handlers.*** Allowing the horse to stand quietly for 5 minutes prior to and after injection may improve the response to Dormosedan.
Adverse Reactions

***As with all α2-agonists, the potential for isolated cases of hypersensitivity, including paradoxical response (excitation) exists.***

I guess nothing's perfect and each of 'us' has a drug of choice... and good and bad experiences...

Bintherewonthat

midnightly
28-08-12, 12:44 AM
There is nothing NOTHING sadder than a drugged and out of it horse. How can you do it?

This person who needs to have her horse clipped NOW has been too lazy all winter. So now the horse needs to be clipped for the spring shows, I gather.

Look after your horse, prepare properly if you need to show in September, and don't put others at risk, and don't put your poor horse through the drugging horrors either. aaaaarrghhh!!

There are better ways ......

ShoeMan
28-08-12, 08:37 AM
There is nothing NOTHING sadder than a drugged and out of it horse. How can you do it?

This person who needs to have her horse clipped NOW has been too lazy all winter. So now the horse needs to be clipped for the spring shows, I gather.

Look after your horse, prepare properly if you need to show in September, and don't put others at risk, and don't put your poor horse through the drugging horrors either. aaaaarrghhh!!

There are better ways ......

Generally agree with the "do the work in the winter and you don't have to clip" mob. That's what we do, it even works in NZ... much easier in Oz.

Also agree with avoiding tranqs.

But there are circumstances where one might want to clip under tranq.

Ace is crap... dangerous to work around (actually they all are), but unless you get a vet out to do a cocktail, Dormosedan paste is a million times better than Ace.

The very rare time I have to work under a tranqed horse... well I refuse to do hinds on an Aced horse, but Dormo works great in most cases.

FWIW

ksm77
28-08-12, 09:50 AM
My brother rode a 16.3hh percheron/tb eventer who was cantankerous when in a good mood - so taking to him with clippers in hand was always a challenge.

For a full body clip, we ended up getting the vet - kocking him out completely, clipping one side, rolled him over (with considerable effort :)), and clipped the other side. Vet stayed until he came around and all was well.

I'd prefer the horse be a bit 'dazed and confused' about the drugging, rather than traumatised by the clippers.

Good Luck!

tgh05
28-08-12, 10:10 AM
I actually don't have a problem with clipping , and when competing seriously my horse was always clipped ( for function not looks).

It's the oh my look at my horse and I wanna go to a show next weekend stuff that irks me...
leads to a little something to keep him calm while I ride ..
leads to a little something to hide his sore foot so I can take him to the show ..
leads to aaaaaaargghhh....

They can all be trained to stand quietly to be clipped , have their teeth done , whatever.. it's just that folks need to learn and work at it.

Bats_79
28-08-12, 10:17 AM
We have two horses that can NOT be clipped! One is the quietest, least reactive horse around but even sedated the feel of the clippers makes him freak. The other is so sensitive to "prick" that he has to be sedated to have a tetanus shot. It's not TRAINING in their case, it's muscle sensitivity. Mind you the mature horse can now 3de without being clipped.

I wonder if people realise that there is RISK to sedation. I personally know a magnificent young horse that was sedated to be clipped when he was suffering from some unknown infection. He wasn't ill at the time but he was getting the sweats (which is why they decided to clip him). The sedation lowered his blood pressure and the "debris" in the blood stream lodged in the back of his eyes and blocked the veins and blinded him. Six months later there was no improvement and the horse wasn't coping with living blind and was PTS. All the experts agreed that it was the result of the sedation but as there was no indication that the horse was sick... The sedation used was something called 'domesedan' (sp?) I think.

tgh05
28-08-12, 10:30 AM
Bats .. thats just not right.. the horse can be clipped without sedation.
You just haven't been prepared to do enough work to make it happen.

I might also say that while the first statement is absolute (IMnsHO) .. some nags will be better drugged because the training could change who they are.
Really talented individuals sometimes have quite strong ideas about stuff.. so for these horses , drugging may be a good solution.
Having said that , I opine that 90% of difficult to clip horses are just having a lend of their owners.

Bats_79
28-08-12, 10:38 AM
Bats .. thats just not right.. the horse can be clipped without sedation.
You just haven't been prepared to do enough work to make it happen.

I might also say that while the first statement is absolute (IMnsHO) .. some nags will be better drugged because the training could change who they are.
Really talented individuals sometimes have quite strong ideas about stuff.. so for these horses , drugging may be a good solution.
Having said that , I opine that 90% of difficult to clip horses are just having a lend of their owners.

Tgh05. We were prepared to spend the time! The owner spent all summer preparing for it. Now we are both prepared to say that we might not have done the right preparation, that we missed something but we did EVERYTHING we could think of to prepare and train for it. And when the clippers got to within 12 inches of his chin the owner was out cold on the ground. Probably HQ or someone with the extra knowledge base could have trained him to accept this ONE thing that he won't accept but we had to give up for safety reasons.

As for the unstichable horse - even when as sedated as possible his skin twitches so rapidly when pricked that it is almost impossible to get local in. Very frustrating.

Zamarie
28-08-12, 10:38 AM
The other is so sensitive to "prick" that he has to be sedated to have a tetanus shot.

Hi Bats_79, can I please just ask - what do you use to sedate to do the tetanus? I've got one that needs monthly Pentosan shots and although he's a very quiet horse, he is very sensitive to the needle prick and is getting very distressed about his shots. I'm guessing you are not injecting the sedation as that would defeat the purpose :) so just wondering if you use a paste or something else?

DB
28-08-12, 10:53 AM
Teegs, you really needed to come spend some time with our two that I've had to sedate to clip. Well, in one case, to not clip. We spent days and days, first with the clippers running int he shed while he was in the stable, then clipped other horses near him, brushed him with the clippers in my hand with them off..... This is a horse who would stand for an hour and look at a new gate with his ears touching in the middle. The other bloke, we couldn't use Ace. We used the one they use to knock 'em out for castration, and I always get it's name mixed up with Flunixol!!! And now that I've done, I have to go away and think about what it's pesky name is. It's an S8, so totally vet only, but best stuff in the world. Dextrine or something...... Eurnghah! Can't think of it!!!!!!!!!!!

And some of ours don't respond to lights - and the clipping is done closer to the beginning of the year, not the end. Purely practical reasons, pre-winter clip for the eventers.

But yes, we sedate a little for a lot of things. Horses are flight animals, and sometimes the sedation just helps them not notice all the tigers, lions, dragons and other stuff lurking about in the float, out hunting, in the clippers..... :D

And yes, Midders, I can feel your eyes boring into my back......... :D

dragonlady
28-08-12, 10:59 AM
oh, get over yourselves you super trainers who can make a horse accept anything.

there's nothing wrong with sedating a horse to clip it. for every one disaster story there are thousands of successful outcomes, you just don't hear about them.

it was a simple question. someone answer it please.

Blighty
28-08-12, 11:12 AM
Zamarie, there was a technique I read about somewhere for giving sensitive horses needles. Can't remember exactly but it involved rubbing the injection site vigorously for 10 mins or so. Something to do with exhausting the nerves response? Someone else on here may know the reasoning.

Zamarie
28-08-12, 11:20 AM
Zamarie, there was a technique I read about somewhere for giving sensitive horses needles. Can't remember exactly but it involved rubbing the injection site vigorously for 10 mins or so. Something to do with exhausting the nerves response? Someone else on here may know the reasoning.

Thanks Blighty - I will try to do a bit of research.

Does anyone know if you can get a topical local anaesthetic to rub into the skin before needling?

drfrankenstein
28-08-12, 01:11 PM
you don't "HAVE" to clip the horse you know... Tell her your life is more important than how her horse looks and let her find some other poor suck to do it.

why would you bloody bother...

Linon
28-08-12, 02:02 PM
I love cyberhorse

lalique
28-08-12, 02:26 PM
Its so absolutely reassuring that when you ask a simple question on here that you will get so many totally unrelated answers and comments to the effect that I dont know what I am doing, thank you so much CH experts..

The horse is well mannered and well educated, but, it has a zero tolerance of clippers around the head and belly areas. It has had extensive work in a effort to desensitize and basically this is not going to happen, I am not going into an extensive description of methods used, just take it on good advice this horse will not respond to desensitizing.

I honestly did not appreciate the comments regarding grooming the coat out in place of clipping. The owner wants the horse clipped and this is not unreasonable apart from the horses issues. I did not ask for anything other than any possible recommendations of what could be used to help pacify the horse to get the job done as quickly and as painlessly (for humans) as possible.

The Vet administers the drug/s but to date there has not been what you would call "the right" one to use. I do not have to sedate or tranq any of mine so it is not an area I am familiar with, but as the Vet seems to be running out of options in his usual list I am asking for possible solutions

I am sorry but in my opinion it is baloney that it is cruel to sedate a horse to clip it once or twice a year. It is the safest and least disturbing for all concerned when the horse shows no signs of ever accepting clippers in specific areas.

Renvers
28-08-12, 02:36 PM
And sometimes you inherit other people's mistakes. I had a little galloway that I bought when she was around 18yo. She was fine to do teeth and feet, wasn't bad to float but she reacted very violently to being clipped, being tied up at a normal/safe length and to being injected. The first time I had her clipped by a friend, who was also a professional clipper, resulted in a broken headcollar, smashed clippers, a black eye and a traumatised horse. So I had the vet sedate her. While in work, she was fully clipped once a year, once her very thick coat had come in (she grew feathers, that's how hairy she was). Stabling wasn't an option as we didn't have any and she stressed in the stable anyway. I was able to overcome all of her other foibles and finally, after years and years, managed to give her a chaser clip on my own (only got kicked in the thigh once when someone else startled her).
Now, I would challenge ANYONE on here, and I mean anyone to have been able to clip this little mare without any form of sedation in the first few years I owned her. I don't believe it could have been done without causing her a great deal of unnecessary stress and risk to the handler.
Having said all that, it was never undertaken on a whim and I used to have to spend hours stripping out her coat each spring, once she'd been retired.

ps. the drugs the vet gave were Dormosedan and something else, sorry it was a long time ago.

TNH
28-08-12, 02:46 PM
there is a spray for humans to numb the skin, not sure if it would work on horses, through the hair etc.

leesa
28-08-12, 02:53 PM
Its so absolutely reassuring that when you ask a simple question on here that you will get so many totally unrelated answers and comments to the effect that I dont know what I am doing, thank you so much CH experts..

I honestly did not appreciate the comments regarding grooming the coat out in place of clipping. I did not ask for anything other than any possible recommendations of what could be used to help pacify the horse to get the job done as quickly and as painlessly (for humans) as possible.

Yes, it is fairly insulting when people jump on something totally unrelated and criticise your ability rather than concentrate on the subject at hand, isn't it?

I do find it interesting that you jump on me for the "lack of disciplining" my horse while trying to demonstrate something, and here we are, you're being criticised for your lack of discipline and training when it comes to clipping your horses. And not liking it, by the looks of things?

I think you'd do well to remember this the next time you want to do the exact same thing to someone else.

jessica18
28-08-12, 02:56 PM
I've seen my
Mum clip some horrors, my 16.3hh warm blood was a classic example, she would stand still while you clipped her whole
Body, to do her head you needed 6ml of ace and a twitch, try twitching the horse as well as sedating, that was
Always the best way I've seen

fire_ball
28-08-12, 05:48 PM
My mare had to have surgery recently to remove a tumor on her girthline. She was heavily sedated, operated on, no problems. Stitch layer one came out on time. Every day the surgical site had to be prodded to encourage drainage... Two weeks in, stitch layer two (one day before it was due for removal) became torn and the mare ripped not only the stitches, but the wound. Back to square one.

More surgery. More sedatives. More prodding. More stitches to be removed... The second time around, when the vet went to remove the stitches, the mare went "nuh uh" and would try to kick at her with her back foot or her front foot. She wasn't mean or nasty, she would just move you away from her wound. Granted after FIVE weeks of poking and bathing and all that jazz, she was pretty touchy.

So. Anyway. Stitches needed to come out. Mare pretty accurate with that back foot. Vet says "sedate her!" Same level of sedative given as when she was operated on - we are talking nose on the ground, eyes glazed, breathing in rocks. Someone had to physically lift her head off of the ground. Vet goes in, touches stitch and mare shakes foot. Right, says the vet, we'll twitch her.... just to be sure. Poor mare, twitched, sedated, I'm lifting her opposite foreleg off the ground to stop her from blocking the wound with her elbow. Vet goes in.... Mare scores a direct hit, fast as a snake. Fully sedated, on three legs, twitched and still fast and accurate.

Moral of the story - when your mare goes on to rip the now-healed wound for a third time, your vet is likely to throw you a can of antibacterial and boot you out the door. Sedative or no.

Good luck clipping the beast!

chuckie
28-08-12, 07:45 PM
There is not a one size fits all for horses. They are individuals and as much a combination of inherited traits and temperament as we are. Yes, you can create or modify problems but sometimes you need to accomodate them for the safety of all concerned and for the well-being of the horse. I'm sorry but I don't know what the vet used to use to sedate our warmblood to clip(for eventing), but it worked well and everyone was happy and safe.

He is an anxious horse (if he was a person he would be diagnosed with anxiety I'm sure) and we give him a low dose of sedazine to shoe and he needs sedating for his frequent trips to the vet for a chronic problem. We know his history and he has led a charmed life, if he was a person I'm sure he would be diagnosed with autism. Natural horsemanship has had no effect and he gets frantic if disciplined under pressure.

We accomodate his differences and he is a happy easy horse. What's wrong with that?

Seahorse01
28-08-12, 08:40 PM
There isn't one recipe for sedating all horses... Many factors taken into account. The drugs that may be considered either alone ( listing chemical names not trade names) or in different combinations are:
Acepromazine
Butorphanol
Diazepam
The alpha 2 agonists ( detomidIne, romifidine and xylazine).
These provide standing sedation to varying degrees. However NONE of them guarantee that the horse wont move.... A general anaesthetic is required for that ( overkill in my opinion for a clip!!). Sedation ok but a GA?!!!

My favourite combination sedation for the hard to clip horse ( very bad one!) is acepromazine, detomidine and butorphanol). The combination depends on the horse and may take several attempts to work out what is just right!

Never ever trust a sedated horse fully - they can still do damage. It can still happen very quickly and accurately.
Speak to your vet about working out what may work for your situation and there may be trial and error!

bintherewonthat
28-08-12, 09:17 PM
Sorry don't know how to do the 'quote' thingy... but Dragonlady wrote ...

"oh, get over yourselves you super trainers who can make a horse accept anything.

there's nothing wrong with sedating a horse to clip it. for every one disaster story there are thousands of successful outcomes, you just don't hear about them.

it was a simple question. someone answer it please."

Your my hero DL! :)

_____________________________________

I don't dope my horses heaps, so sorry I wasn't much of help...more trying for moral support as we all knew where it would go.... what I do know is this wasn't a post about ...

Training a horse to Clip?
Best way to get a coat out?
Is doping a horse cruel?
I know more then anyone about (multi choice) *training, desensitizing, horse's rights, doping, getting coats out, dealing with alpaca length coats, making you feel like shit (please only choose 1)

Bintherewonthat

Thank you Seahorse01, that appears the type of help the original poster was hoping for.

rmjens
28-08-12, 10:25 PM
Listen to Seahorse.

I would use acp + detomidine 1st option and add butorphanol if a real crazy.... enough to cut nuts out so plenty to clip, just don't muck about- do the difficult bits first.

from the OH

bintherewonthat
28-08-12, 10:32 PM
rmjens, do YOU suggest this to your vet? Do they accept your concoction as being suitable, or is it a well know cocktail?

Bintherewonthat... (but haven't bintheredopedthat for a while)

Blighty
29-08-12, 11:02 AM
Ha Ha, I just read that as 'Do YOU do this to your vet" :D

dragonlady
29-08-12, 04:00 PM
rmjens' post was from her OH who IS a vet. my thanks to seahorse too.

dragonlady
29-08-12, 04:04 PM
lmao blighty, it's probably not polite to ask what she does do to her vet, lol, lol.

lalique
29-08-12, 06:54 PM
Thanks very much for the few serious answers, they are genuinely appreciated!

Leesa- go back to school and learn to read- I do not own the horse, I am only the poor fool being roped into clipping it. As I have some interest in self preservation I would like to do the job as safely as possible for me and as stress free as possible for the horse.

Having clipped this same horse for the past 3 years I am more than aware of what it cannot or will not tolerate, and I have only just avoided a nasty injury on several occasions. You can clip the neck and body by just taking it slowly but the top of the head, the belly, brisket and the inner legs are strictly off limits. Even using he small trimmer clippers on these areas results in the same reaction. The biggest problem is that when clipping in these areas you are also in the most vulnerable position and less likely to be able to avoid injury

I do not intend to "tell" the Vet what to use, but I am happy to run some suggestions by him and see what he thinks

NikJ
29-08-12, 09:21 PM
there is a spray for humans to numb the skin, not sure if it would work on horses, through the hair etc.

I use a patch for my son when he gets needles, you can also get a cream and then you have to cover for up to 2 hours. The stuff is called Emla - it's 2.5% lignocaine and 2.5% prilocaine. I would check with a vet to make sure these don't create reactions if used on animals.

With the needle with the sensitive rose I would also look at doing a neck twitch and needling into the pinched skin. If that hasn't been tried.

Can't comment on drugging as I am extremely fortunate that my mare thinks she is getting a full body massage. My mini got introduced to clippers whilst on his dam by his breeder. You can do anything with him, fingers down ears etc. Now to introduce my filly and hope she gets it quickly as she is terribly smart.

bintherewonthat
29-08-12, 09:53 PM
Sorry guys... maybe it came out wrong... I really mean that... "do you suggest a particular mixture to a vet (your vet), can you?"

Bintherewonthat

Miniature Lover
29-08-12, 10:14 PM
Can you take the horse to the vet and clip it? That way if anything goes wrong and you need more sedative there is someone there who can give it.

Well that is what the local vet here does anyway, they wont give you the sedative they say if you want to clip the horse you can take it and do it there.