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integrity (Guest)
14-10-02, 11:47 AM
Hi all
Wondering if anyone has had problems breeding with a mare that has suffered what is commonly known as a 'knock-down hip' or fractured tuber coxae? My rising four year old anglo filly did a good job of running into a tree around 6 weeks ago, and although is heeling well, i doubt that she will ever be quite the same for performance (i was planning on campdrafting and endurancing her). She is a lovely type and cycles well and seems to be walking ok but a bit short behind in trot and canter. Any feedback greatly appreciated as i may have someone interested in leasing her for breeding.

Cheers

kylie (Guest)
26-10-02, 01:54 AM
You might be able to find something along these lines in the archives - not sure though. I think I have previously come across a similar subject in the archives.

I have heard that some horses continue with a great ridden career with the hip fracture as long as it is allowed to heal. I also doubt it will cause a lot of problems with foaling, although a vet is probably the best person to give an opinion on this. I would not choose to put her in foal to a larger horse, but that is my opinion. I think to start with I would probably try her with a much smaller stallion. Or you could probably AI her. I would just be a little careful the first time around. And have a vet on stand-by (as you should anyway) in case something happens. But if she is exhibiting no pain or any problems at all, then I don't see why you would have any dramas. But I would be waiting a good year or so to make sure her hip has totally healed up. And do lots of walking with her to strengthen her muscles up, make sure she is not allowed to get too fat and probably even get a equine masseus in every now and then to make sure her muscles are supple and in good form as she might be using certain muscle groups to compensate for her sore hip and might need a nice massage to help ease any tightness. This is just my opinion though! I would do it for my girls if they had the same problem. Won't do any harm. Best of luck with her.

Heather PALMER (Guest)
21-11-02, 03:58 PM
>Hi all
>Wondering if anyone has had problems
>breeding with a mare that
>has suffered what is commonly
>known as a 'knock-down hip'
>or fractured tuber coxae?
>My rising four year old
>anglo filly did a good
>job of running into a
>tree around 6 weeks ago,
>and although is heeling well,
>i doubt that she will
>ever be quite the same
>for performance (i was planning
>on campdrafting and endurancing her).
> She is a lovely
>type and cycles well and
>seems to be walking ok
>but a bit short behind
>in trot and canter.
>Any feedback greatly appreciated as
>i may have someone interested
>in leasing her for breeding.
>
>
>Cheers


Hi, Cheers

One of my brood mares many years ago did the splits on the race track, and suffered a broken pelvis. As a result of that she was given to me for nothing, because after the owners trying several times unsuccessfully to get a foal out of her, they then wrote her off as a barren mare.

I got her in foal several times but no foal ever eventuated, so I resorted to what I usually do in this case, and left it up to the stallion. I let her run with one of my stallions for a year until she eventually went right through a whole pregnancy and foaled in his paddock with him.

Whilst I need to keep a constant watch on whether she is starting to suffer too much pain in the pelvis, I am aware that her problem in holding a foal is more related to the fact that she is very highly strung, stresses very easily, and her progesterone levels are very easily thrown out of balance. And of course if a stallion has a mare running with him, then part of his job is to keep all that under control for her.

In short, I trust my stallions judgement before my own, in such matters. And of course I'm fortunate that I have my own stallions, and can take this course of action.

Hence, my advice is that "Yes, it can be done, but it might take a while to succeed".

Good Luck

Heather Palmer