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sheesa
16-09-04, 05:16 AM
Recently I took my mare to a vet for Frozen semen insemination, my mare was cycling beautifully and the subsequent follicle ruptered and the mare was inseminated. The question is after the mare has been inseminated the mare was then subject to 10 (ten) needles of syntocin i.m given every two hours. Now this mare always goes in foal and has never been difficult to breed with, now I have a mare who is not in foal.
I am now wondering what the affects are to the uterus, I thought the injection was only given for retained fluid or retained placenta,there was no fluid present five (5) hours after insemination, so why would you do this, and does anybody else know of or have heard of a vet that does this.

Integrity
16-09-04, 05:43 AM
I'm not sure but will do a bit of research - I assume you did not inseminate her?

Interesting: email me! :D

sheesa
16-09-04, 09:26 AM
The vet did inseminate her....three cycles this treatment happened. And the mare did not concieve, I have read some research about this treatment but it never mentions 10 needles two hours apart.
Has something been done wrong?
I have privately e-mailed you with the hope someone can explain this
I personally think this is a bit drastic and probably messed up the uterus with all the contractions the mare would suffer, perhaps less drugs is best to keep the cycle as close to normal as possible using frozen semen.

Fetlock
18-09-04, 07:19 AM
Composition Oxytocin 10 i.u./mL.
Actions Oxytocin is a hormone released by the posterior pituitary gland. It has stimulant effects on the smooth muscle of the uterus and mammary gland, which is both selective and potent. In domestic animals the uterine stimulation caused by the release of oxytocin facilitates the ascent of spermatozoa. In the mammary gland contraction of smooth muscle of the myoepithelium forces milk from the alveolar channels into the large sinuses (milk let down) where it is available for sucking.
Syntocin causes peristaltic waves of contraction in the uterus, provided that the uterus has been suitably primed by hormones. Works only during primary, secondary and tertiary labour and for about 2 days thereafter. Causes milk let down within 15 minutes of subcutaneous injection. Best given intravenously where prompt assistance in giving birth is required, otherwise action occurs 15 minutes after subcutaneous injection and is weaker.
Indications For stimulation of uterine contractions and as an aid in the control of minor post partum haemorrhage and in the removal of retained placenta.
Withholding Periods Meat - Nil, Milk - Nil.

Given the fact that the name syntocin is another name for oxytocin which is commonly used in australia for birth induction, I fail to see why this drug would be used so commonly (every 2hrs) on a mare being inseminated. Surely there are better conditioning drugs available that vets would use. I'd love to know the name of the vet, cause you can bet bottom dollar I would be steering well away with my mares!

Integrity
18-09-04, 11:19 AM
Agree - hormones are tricky things at the best of times: my question would be: WHY? quickly followed by: REPERCUSSIONS?

After all, it's YOUR mare, not the vets!

sheesa
18-09-04, 03:57 PM
Well written "Fetlock" you have pointed out and so eliquently written exactly what I know and have researched.
I am bewildered as to this form of treatment and am a little to say the least astounded this has been used when other independant vets I have spoken to have never heard of this.
The vet in question will never again touch my mares as I have found no logical reasons for using so many injections over that period of time.
"Integrity" the repercussions are now so obvious, this mare is cycling as per normal (for this time of the year) but the uterus is inflamed at the same time.
I think the mare is a right off for the season and needs to recover hormonally from this before any further attempt are made to breed her.

sheesa
26-09-04, 03:56 PM
Please has anyone else heard of this treatment.
Any advice is needed here.

excited angel
27-09-04, 07:21 AM
Oxytocin injections that frequently would lose their effectiveness. After a mare foals, I give 3 - 5ml oxy IM to help expel the membranes, or if that is completed, to assist in toning the uterus. If membranes are not expelled, usually after another 2 injections, the oxy. loses its 'punch'. Did your vet explain why so many injections were necessary?

Would be happy for you to contact me direct for a chat. Julie

sheesa
27-09-04, 09:22 AM
Thanks, I have e-mailed you.

Cate
27-09-04, 10:46 PM
Oxytocin is given to help with delayed clearance. Delayed clearance causes uterine irritation, although I think every 2 hours is too frequently, more commonly it is give every 6 hours.
Have a look on http://www.equine-reproduction.com/articles/oxytocin.htm

sheesa
10-10-04, 03:54 AM
Just an update,,

The mare is not to be rebred this season as she cycles and produces follicles but the uterus fails to ripen.
Upon advise from a better expert the mare is to be left to recover from the effects of (overdosing) Oxytocin.....

squid hill
10-10-04, 06:15 AM
I do breeding and am a qualified AI technition and Im amased at why they would want to use the drugs at all if your mare has no fluid in the uterus.
The best time to inseminate is just before the follicle ruptures, after it you might as well not waist your time as they dont usually get in foal.
I have used saline or the mares blood to flush out and condition the uterus the day or morning before breeding and you can flush again with saline after around 6-8 hours after inseminating as any sperm worth its salt is already on the way up the tubes and will not be flushed out. This is ONLY if the mare has a diagnosed problem. Oh and I dont diagnose the probs, that is done by a vet with ultrasound, Im only qualified to treat them on my property.

I really cant understand your vet, and I would be concerned that the mare has been inseminated at the wrong time, or spat it out due to the drugs.

Better luck next time.

www.squidhill.com

riverviewlodge1
14-10-04, 05:30 AM
jUST ME AGAIN I HAVE USED OXY AFTER INSEMINATION BUT NOT TO THAT DEGREE. APPARENTLY WITH THE CONTRACTIONS IT SUCKS THE SEMEN IN NOT OUT AND HELPS THE FOLLICLE MOVE DOWN. THESE DAYS I JUST USE OVUPLANTS AND TEASE THEM OFF. I HAVE USED DIFFERENT VETS AND THEY ALL HAVE DIFFERENT THINGS THEY LIKE TO DO AND SOME TIMES THEY ARE QUITE CONTRADICTORY.

JUST LIKE PEOPLE USED TO SAY AFTER BEING COVER YOU SHOULDN'T LET THEM PEE BUT WHEN THEY PEE THE MUSCLES ACTUALLY SUCK THE SEMEN BACK THE OTHER WAY NOT OUT.

THERE COULDN'T HAVE BEEN ANY FLUID LET AFTER ALL THAT OXY

Integrity
14-10-04, 06:01 AM
Oxytocin use in the mare during breeding
By Jos Mottershead

Oxytocin acts on smooth muscle in the body, causing it to contract. One such area of tissue, which is of tremendous importance relative to breeding, is the mare's uterus.

It has been recognized for some time that fluid build up in the uterus can be detrimental to establishing or maintaining pregnancy, and with a view to removal of such fluid there has been research into the use of oxytocin.

Uterine fluid is most commonly seen by ultrasound post-breeding, and is usually present as a result of a natural response to a foreign object in the uterus - semen. In most mares, this fluid poses no problem to the establishment or maintenance of pregnancy, and is cleared within 24 - 48 hours by the mare herself. In some mares however, especially multiparous, older, or mares with poor reproductive conformation, a condition known as "delayed uterine clearance" may occur. This results in the fluid not being cleared, and will possibly result in the conceptus encountering an inhospitable environment when it enters the uterus 4.5 to 6 days post-ovulation.

Uterine fluid encountered in estrus mares during an ultrasonic evaluation prior to breeding (often during an examination of the follicular status of the ovaries) has recently been established to be detrimental to establishing or maintaining pregnancy1. Generally amounts in excess of one-half inch depth are considered excessive, and suitable for treatment with oxytocin. Amounts in excess of one inch are considered to be more likely to respond favourably to lavage, and the resulting exudate should also be evaluated for inflammatory cells and bacteria, as a bacterial uterine infection may be the cause.

The post-breeding treatment that I have seen to be most effective has been intramuscular oxytocin, combined with an intra-uterine infusion of a broad-spectrum antibiotic. Experimental work by others has also found this to be more effective2. I have also noted that in the case of excessive fluid build-up post breeding, multiple treatments with oxytocin may work better. The first intramuscular or intravenous injection of oxytocin (see below for dosage information) should be at least 4 hours after breeding, which allows adequate time for all sufficiently progressively sperm to make their way to the oviducts (which are not affected by the oxytocin treatment). This is then followed by an intra-uterine infusion of antibiotic 2 hours later, and then three more intramuscular or intravenous injections at six hourly intervals (the first of which takes place 6 hours after the uterine infusion). It should be noted that oxytocin has a lesser effect post-ovulation.

Pre-breeding, it is considered to be more important to solely remove the fluid, rather than infusing antibiotic, as long as no uterine bacteria have been found to be present.

Initially the suitable dosage level of oxytocin was most commonly considered to be 20 international units, but recent research3 has suggested a lower dose - 10 i.u. - to be more suitable prior to ovulation. The research indicated that the higher dosage results in a more concerted constriction of the smooth muscle, whereas the lower dosage results in a methodical constriction starting at the distal portion of the horns, and working caudally, which would result in a more complete and systematic evacuation of the fluid. Once ovulation has occured, the effect of oxytocin is reduced, so increasing the dosage to 20 i.u. is appropriate.

Some users of this treatment protocol are favouring the use of the synthetic prostaglandin analogue Cloprostenol, rather than oxytocin, as it is felt to have a longer active period than does the oxytocin. Additionally, intramuscular use rather than intravenous has been favoured as allowing a slower, longer passage. Recent research4 on the use of prostaglandin analogues at this stage however has indicated that there may be an intereference with the development of a fully functional Corpus Luteum, and is therefore not recommended. It is a reasonable extrapolation of that finding to believe that similar use of prostaglandin would yield the same results.

If the cervix is found to be excessively tight, treating the mare with Estradiol Cypionate may also be indicated. This may be done either pre- or post-breeding, depending upon the need. It should be noted that higher dosage rates of estradiol prior to ovulation should be carried out with caution, as this may delay ovulation.

2000 and 2002 Jos Mottershead. May be used upon notification, and with accreditation.

1: Pycock, J.F. and Newcombe, J.R. (1996) The relationship between intraluminal uterine fluid, endometritis and pregnancy rate in the mare.Equine Pract. 18, 19-22.

2: Pycock, J.F. (1994) Assessment of oxytocin and intrauterine antibiotics on intrauterine fluid and pregnancy rates in the mare. Proc. 40th Ann. Conv. Am. Ass. Equine Pract.

3: Cadario, M.E., Merritt, A.M., Archbald, L.F., Thatcher, W.W., LeBlanc, M.M. (1998) Changes in intrauterine pressure after oxytocin administration in reproductively normal mares and in those with a delay in uterine clearance, Theriogenology (51)5 (1999) pp.

4: James P. Brendemuehl, DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACT (2001) Effect of Oxytocin and PGF2a on Luteal Formation, Function, and Pregnancy Rates in Mares, AAEP PROCEEDINGS/Vol. 47/2001; 239

Just a bit of light reading :D

from www.equine-reproduction.com

DeniseS
26-10-04, 06:32 AM
Thanks for the info integrity !!

This sounds very similar to what my vets do as they're standard procedure. The mares are flushed eight hours after insemination and given an oxy injection. then a follow up one another 12 hours later i think....ugh i really should have a better idea than that...sorry.

I haven't heard of the Oxy every two hours tho..that's new to me.

Our vets are averaging a pregnancy every 1.2 inseminations so that to me would indicate they're practices are pretty damn good.

Sure wish i hadn't of gotten three preganancies outta two inseminations last time !!.........such a waste crushing a Jazz baby.

Oh well......