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mindari
27-03-11, 12:25 PM
thought this should have its own thread. such a sad story.

anyone else know ways to stop a horse from doing that as described in the thread.

this is one I was taught that has worked for us.


can happen so easily.
one suggestion i can make to prevent such sudden bucking attacks is if you have a horse that has done this is a trick i was taught by Bill Law and it works. he would put a nose band of baling wire (thats all there was in the 60's) but i quickly learnt baling twine is just as affective. put a metal ring in the noseband and adjust it so its roughly about the same placing as a caveson if behind the bit so the bit cannot pinch against it.

then another length of baling twine from one saddle dee through the ring and back to the dee on the other side of the saddle. adjusted to no pressure on the nose when the head is in normal position. the ring enables it to run freely and not interfere in head movement to either side.

it comes into instant play when the horse thows it head down and a bucking horse throws it down so hard and fast the slam on the nose is beyond you could guess.

we had a mare that would dump you the second your attention was distracted. i rode her all day once with not a hint. then my neighbour called my name, half turned to answer her and wham. one the ground she was so fast. hubby gripped the saddle to stay on during one fit and she bucked both him and the saddle off still between his knees.

sooo. what is usually referred to as the 'grass rein' in place. yes angelec all muster. someone called out to me and wham she was into it except the whole thing stoped before her head was halfway down to her knees and she screamed she received such a surprise she hit the nose band so hard. i barely moved in the saddle.

she wore it every single ride for over a year, put in quite a few in the first months then never again.

a friend suggested she seems to have forgotten trying anymore we we left it off and no she never did again. now safe she was onsold and won many many champion ribbons under saddle as well as led. even beat a couple of times a 7,000 multi sydney royal champ another friend owned. knowing her prior histry he was not a happy camper

but if you have a horse you do not trust this can be a life saver or at least a fall saver, she never dropped another rider with that on, and ultimaely became a totaly safe ride, she was a totaly bitch until then she had dropped hubby as often as 3 times in one muster

tgh05
27-03-11, 01:42 PM
There are an awful lot of nice horses looking for a home.. why risk your life with one who doesn't care about it ?

Muzziet
27-03-11, 02:35 PM
I understand what you are saying tgh05 but perhaps a bit black and white.
Plenty of good performance horses around buck or have vices that must be acceptable to some or they would be in the doggers yard.

Some horses learn to buck as avoidance later in life when they have had enough of whatever is upsetting them or just as pure defense in a frightening situation. Our normally sane 17h Shire/Clyde bucked up a storm when a kid rode at him on a push bike but you could ride him past a ploughing tractor no worries.

We used to drive my harness pony with a bucking strap for quite a while after she was going, and doing well because she wasn't reliable, if her tail blew between her legs she would have a go, but never any other time.

You can see it in the photo, just in front of the post, going from shaft to shaft across her back.

http://i761.photobucket.com/albums/xx257/muzziet/EchoFelspar1983.jpg


I certainly wouldn't choose a bucker but it does happen. We use all sorts of tools to train then to do what we want or not what they want :)

EarsForward
27-03-11, 03:08 PM
Great Photo!

mindari
27-03-11, 07:22 PM
There are an awful lot of nice horses looking for a home.. why risk your life with one who doesn't care about it ?

ive trained many youngsters who have never even thought of a pigroot, the mare i referred to was hubbys and she seemed to think it was funny, she would wait the split second your attention was elsewhere and dump him then me. once you were unloaded she would nudge you as if saying hurry up lets get going......grrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.

every fall is potentialy dangerous let alone a deliberate dumping... did the one Bill taught me and she gave it up. .. ive found it's worked on dozens of kids pony clubber ponies who discover drop head to grass and kid cant hold their head up. it isnt a long step to dropping head at walk, trot or canter and the idea becomes habit. that grass rein has stopped many a slide to the doggers.

mindari
27-03-11, 07:24 PM
Great Photo!

certainly is, thanks for posting

mindari
27-03-11, 07:51 PM
theres also the one thats never done a thing wrong before.

trouble is we all realise any fall can be a disaster. it doesnt have to be thats done it before. my friend is lucky to be alive after his normally placid mare went berserk, bolted and then began bucking like a mad bronc.

his hip was shattered in the resulting fall. turned out a largish seed might have fallen on her back as they went down the hill through the scrub and slid under the saddle cloth as they reached the bottom it went under the saddle itself and she did the biscuit.
he doesnt discount could it have been caught up in the saddle cloth while saddling, will never know

Harriette
27-03-11, 08:17 PM
I like the reference to 'grass reins'
I always worry about attaching grass reins to the bit
but this is a better option all round, till the little darlins 'try something'.
is the nose section above the nasal cartilage suture?
would 'modern' twine hold well enough?
so there is also a loop up and around the head to hold the nose section??


is the harness horse wearing a flank strap to stop humping??
looks to me like a flank strap/ unless it just lifts the shafts with the humping

mindari
27-03-11, 09:06 PM
I like the reference to 'grass reins'
I always worry about attaching grass reins to the bit
but this is a better option all round, till the little darlins 'try something'.
is the nose section above the nasal cartilage suture?
would 'modern' twine hold well enough?
so there is also a loop up and around the head to hold the nose section??


is the harness horse wearing a flank strap to stop humping??
looks to me like a flank strap/ unless it just lifts the shafts with the humping

is the nose section above the nasal cartilage suture?

I put it in the same spot you would normally put the cavason (two to 3 finger widths) below the end of the cheek bone and yes i do run it through either cavason headpiece if its just loops and can take the leather one out. or failing that have even simply put it through the loops of the side cheeks holding up the bit, as its purpose isnt to hold the mouth shut is just there to hit and hold them from throwing the head between the knees, dont make it too big should be able to put two to three fingers between head and twine

would 'modern' twine hold well enough?

absolutely, its so strong it would hold something like quarter of a ton breaking strain, no way the horse is going to put that amount onto its own nose, you wouldnt either



is the harness horse wearing a flank strap to stop humping??
looks to me like a flank strap/ unless it just lifts the shafts with the humping


to me a flank strap goes round the body, ive heard of these bucking straps and as i understand it they are buckled to the shaft go over the back and buckled to the other shaft. so to try and buck they are trying to life the entire sulky weight.


the rearing strap ive heard of and told its positioned so when they rear they slam themselves in the stomach so feels they have been winded.
never seen one done up only been told about them