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Djangoandjacana
25-02-12, 12:22 PM
It is a mysterious world to me. I used to do obedience years ago with one of my Borders but never breed shows.

I'm hatching a plan that is probably a pipe dream but it might necessitate showing dogs. It scares me a little, but at least I can put said dog in the car and not have to tow a float. That has to be plus :D

It's not to do with current dog hunting, it's a future project.

Toriadore
25-02-12, 12:42 PM
I bred bull terriers about 10 yers ago. Was hard but very rewarding work and had our dogs go all over the country. Nothing like a little bunch of puppies to play with. :)

teetee
25-02-12, 12:53 PM
From what I can tell its very much like in hand showing with horses :D

I spend a bit of time on Dogz and of course there are heaps of showies and breeders there, just make sure you take a cup of concrete and your flame suit before heading on over lol! :D Seriously though there is a lot of advice to be had in the show forum, from reading a lot of threads you need to pal up to breeders in the breed of your choice, try and latch on to someone to get them to show you the ropes and most of the advice is don't try to get a bitch as your first show dog as the good ones are too hard to find most people advise getting a male first to see how you go.

I think it's a tough game but if you've done a bit of horse showing you would have a good idea of what to expect I think, having said that I don't think I'd ever be brave enough to take on the world of dog showing, plus having entires at home would be a pain in the ass for me and there's not much in the way of classes for neuters. Thank goodness we can easily show geldings! :)

skymare
25-02-12, 01:39 PM
I had a plan many years ago to get into the dog show world. I bought a Briard and the breeders showed her for me at the Melb Royal show. I planned to breed her, but never got around to it. I was too nervous about all the things that could go wrong. I didn't have the time or ability to deal with any disasters like hand feeding pups if mum didn't. I had reason to worry because that what happened to my bitch. And I didn't like the corruption in the dog world and what I saw people doing to their dogs to win a ribbon. I'm now no longer interested. I do have moral standards to adhere to.

k8
25-02-12, 03:32 PM
https://www.facebook.com/awdri.com.au

check out the pups they've just got in... first two on the page..... absolutely make you melt...gorgeous!

Djangoandjacana
25-02-12, 04:34 PM
K8 I looked on their web page after the last time you mentioned it but I couldn't find them. I think I would have have been quite happy with one of those speckily pair but I bet they are gone in a heart beat.


Have just arrived home with our new dog. Not quite a rescue, she is a rehomed breeders dog. They needed to make room and rehoming the easy one meant their own rescue dogs, including a gorgeous greyhound stay in their home.

GDR
25-02-12, 05:10 PM
I've shown dogs since 1972. In all that time, I've never come across any of the so called nastiness that so many people have complained about with dog shows. I'm sure it happens in some breeds but maybe I've been lucky with mine. People tend to show my breeds for the original reason shows of any kind were begun ie to display your stock and look for other lines to use with your own. One of my breeds in particular hasn't changed in centuries. Photos of dogs taken in the 1800's would win in the show ring today.

I have giant breeds and can easily prepare and take 4-5 to a show by myself and have a relaxing day. You can't say the same thing about horse shows.

There is little demand for either of my breeds (hence the lack of puppy farmers thank goodness) which may be why people new to my breeds find it easy to get a show quality pup of either sex. I only breed occasionally and usually still have most of my litters at 6 months of age. I invariably lose a minimum of $3,000 - $4,000 on each litter.

Chose your breed wisely, show for the right reasons and I'm sure you'll enjoy it and make lifelong friends.

Centaur
25-02-12, 06:26 PM
I used to show my Irish Setter back in UK, and did obedience with my Wolfhound cross. It was fun and I did it because I didn't have a horse at the time!

Neisje
25-02-12, 09:22 PM
Go watch the movie Best in Show :D that will pretty much tell you what showing dogs is like LOL that movie cracks me up, I swear I've met every single character at some point out at a show.

cbz
26-02-12, 07:40 AM
I've shown dogs since 1972. In all that time, I've never come across any of the so called nastiness that so many people have complained about with dog shows. I'm sure it happens in some breeds but maybe I've been lucky with mine. People tend to show my breeds for the original reason shows of any kind were begun ie to display your stock and look for other lines to use with your own. One of my breeds in particular hasn't changed in centuries. Photos of dogs taken in the 1800's would win in the show ring today.

I have giant breeds and can easily prepare and take 4-5 to a show by myself and have a relaxing day. You can't say the same thing about horse shows.

There is little demand for either of my breeds (hence the lack of puppy farmers thank goodness) which may be why people new to my breeds find it easy to get a show quality pup of either sex. I only breed occasionally and usually still have most of my litters at 6 months of age. I invariably lose a minimum of $3,000 - $4,000 on each litter.

Chose your breed wisely, show for the right reasons and I'm sure you'll enjoy it and make lifelong friends.

What breeds do you have GDR? (I'm very intrigued at the idea of a breed that hasn't changed since the 1800s because a lot of breeds have just got more and more extreme in their distinguishing characteristics in that time).

Autumn
26-02-12, 10:11 AM
I have bred border collies for many years and used to show a LONG time ago. I also did quite a bit of obediance at a large club and now do it locally with a great lady and much smaller classes.

Personally you can keep the 'showing' - it was ok at the time but looking back is was horrid and very, very bitchy!!! There was a hell of alot of waiting around which my dogs hated (I found it rather taxing too). Some people where nice and supportive but I met more who here really awful. I would never go there again - WORSE than horse showing in my book.

We are planning to breed a little of BC's this year, my bitch is now 3yrs old and is pure bred but does not have papers. My boy (who is just gorgeous!) is just over 1yr and has papers. I am thinking of selling them for around $400 each - but will be guided by my boys breeder.

Some puppy pics from years ago -
Mitchell - dec at 8yrs
http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss114/YunaRickard/Dogs/mitch19nov.jpg
Deli - still around at 9yrs
http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss114/YunaRickard/Dogs/deli19nov.jpg
Monty - grown up
http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss114/YunaRickard/Dogs/monty02nov.jpg
Monty was sold to BC breeder son and he went on to be used as a stud dog.

My Rex - father to be!
http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss114/YunaRickard/Dogs/P8010007.jpg

GDR
26-02-12, 05:44 PM
What breeds do you have GDR? (I'm very intrigued at the idea of a breed that hasn't changed since the 1800s because a lot of breeds have just got more and more extreme in their distinguishing characteristics in that time).

Scottish Deerhounds and Borzoi. Show me a picture of a Deerie from 150 years ago and I can show you a dog today that looks the same.

shadowmystique
26-02-12, 05:55 PM
Was just at a specialty show last night with my rotti bitch, I can see I have a bit of work to do but have found everyone quite nice and generally fairly laid back... The breeds that have more bitchyness going on seem to be the ones that need special grooming to be presented, such as poodles, poms, afghan hounds etc :o

Utility dogs are expected to be clean and neat and well behaved... That's it :)

Djangoandjacana
26-02-12, 08:31 PM
Ok so let me get this right. The reasons for showing are:

Because you enjoy it
Because other people who enjoy it will see your stock
To get titles for your stock to make them more desirable to other breeders and people who like showing

That is there is no requirement to do breed showing of dogs to be a registered breeder of quality stock for pets, obedience agility etc? that may sound like stupid question but I'm not sure where the 'backyard' bit comes into dog breeding.

The dog we just got comes from people who do show and do obedience, they have a breeding goal in what they are trying to achieve with improving each generation and all the dogs have all their required regular checks. They have bred 3 litters in 6 years. So that sounds to me like a reputable breeder. If they didn't show (therefore have their stock independently assessed) would they be any the less a reputable breeder?

GDR
26-02-12, 09:06 PM
Ok so let me get this right. The reasons for showing are:

Because you enjoy it
Because other people who enjoy it will see your stock
To get titles for your stock to make them more desirable to other breeders and people who like showing

That is there is no requirement to do breed showing of dogs to be a registered breeder of quality stock for pets, obedience agility etc? that may sound like stupid question but I'm not sure where the 'backyard' bit comes into dog breeding.

The dog we just got comes from people who do show and do obedience, they have a breeding goal in what they are trying to achieve with improving each generation and all the dogs have all their required regular checks. They have bred 3 litters in 6 years. So that sounds to me like a reputable breeder. If they didn't show (therefore have their stock independently assessed) would they be any the less a reputable breeder?

Showing per se doesn't make one a reputable breeder. Reputable breeders have a thorough knowledge of the breed standard of their particular breed and also the various bloodlines that exist, what genetic tests are required or advised etc.

Showing is the easiest way to see what specimens of your breed are around and to get your eye in. However, if you don't want to show, you can still go to shows as a spectator. If you don't want to even go to shows as a spectator, you would need to do a lot more legwork ie actually visiting other breeders to view their stock, talking to other breeders in depth about bloodlines and the history behind them etc. You would probably be doing all this anyway regardless of whether you show or not. Belonging to breed societies is one of the best ways to learn about your breed. Nearly all breeds have books written on them by breeders that have decades of experience in their breed. I don't mean the superficial type books aimed at the general public either.

Just because you have two dogs of the same breed that you want to mate together doesn't mean the resulting pups will be good, or even average specimens of their breed. That is where the backyard bit comes in. People who have no idea what a good example of their breed looks like and have no idea of their dogs' pedigrees so don't know what problems may be behind them just to name a couple of issues. Breed standards aren't something that people have dreamt up. They are firmly based in what the dogs were originally bred for and were often written by people who actually used them for those purposes.

md
26-02-12, 09:27 PM
I LOOVE Scottish Deerhounds, its on my bucket list, to be able to afford, just once, just one Deerhound in my life (love Borzoi's as well) you lucky person to have such fantastic breeds.

I once took my ex husband to a dog show to show him the deerhounds, needless to say being chinese they were almost as big as him and me both, but I always think of those old Sherlock Holmes series with the manor and the Deerhounds gracefully lying in front of the fire :) I so need pics please please, pm if you want.

A very good friend of mine breeds and shows dogs, boxers mainly, but he also has Aussies, he did have a rough collie at one stage, and they also now have Westies and his daughter breeds and show pugs and Labs I think, he says there is some nastiness in the show world, but really no different to real life, most are there for their beloved breeds and enjoy their dogs and the shows they go to, is it any different to horse shows, probably not, they all want the ellusive blue ribbon.

When I am too old for horses rather than buy a mini, think I will buy a dog I can show lol.

GDR
26-02-12, 09:45 PM
md, I've pm'd you.

shadowmystique
26-02-12, 09:56 PM
*backyard breeders* are people breeding unregistered and often cross bred or sub par specimens.

Generally you need to be a Canine Control Council with a registered prefix (you have to do a test to prove sufficient knowledge of breeding) and a breed registry membership is also good to have.

You then need to comply with the breed health checks (hip/eye/etc scoring) Showing is not required but can increase the value of the offspring (which is the only reason I'm doing it) and pups need to be registered, microchipped and vaccinated. Not sold in pet shops or before the age of 8 weeks. Suitable information must be provided to puppy purchasers for them to care for their new puppy responsibly...

Generally a responsible breeder is trying to improve and maintain the integrity, health and functionality of the breed.

Djangoandjacana
26-02-12, 10:00 PM
The breed I have fallen in love with ( of course) isn't available in Australia. They are a European breed with about 4,000 there. Around 250 in the US.

To get a registered dog you have to go on a waiting list and pass a reference check.

So it is just a dream, a very long research project and a hope in the meantime someone else brings some in so I can have one as a pet :D