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Thread: Training at the walk

  1. #11
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    Perhaps I could borrow the thread to get some opinions from you guys?
    I've started riding again and am 4 rides in so far and Buzz is suuuuper forward. He's quite stiff but is starting to supple up and bend around my leg but he trots like a bat out of hell at the moment. He's been trained to respond to seat but because my seat is pretty shitty at the moment I think i'm sending him way too forward as I don't yet have the strength to regulate it better.

    So that's my dilemma. I don't hold him back with my hands, it'd just end up in a pulling fight, but as soon as he gets down a long side he extends himself and just goes for it.
    I end up popping him into canter as i have better control of my seat there and then do a canter-walk or slow the canter and then drop back into a better trot. Because my seat is shitty i cant quite half halt him before he gets going either.

    There's no naughtiness in it, just too forward and rushing if given the opportunity.
    I was considering putting some poles down one side but it's 50/50 whether it'd work or he'd launch himself over them. ;D

    Any ideas on how to approach this?

  2. #12
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    Simple.. whenever he accelerates, ask him nicely to steady .. use your voice to reinforce your dodgy aids, and if nothing happens ...make a large circle… now..

    If he doesn't /hasn't get/got the message yet make the circle smaller.. no horse can run away in a 5m circle….

    Never pull.. never ever ever ever ev……

    Ask nicely and then quickly create an environment where listening is a good option, reward ,repeat….
    The only thing wrong with a horse is that it is usually attached to a human

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgh05 View Post
    Simple.. whenever he accelerates, ask him nicely to steady .. use your voice to reinforce your dodgy aids, and if nothing happens ...make a large circle… now..

    If he doesn't /hasn't get/got the message yet make the circle smaller.. no horse can run away in a 5m circle….

    Never pull.. never ever ever ever ev……

    Ask nicely and then quickly create an environment where listening is a good option, reward ,repeat….
    I haven't got the flexibility in my lower back enough yet to ask him to steady.
    I don't think it's that he's not listening, I think it's more likely that I'm not asking clearly and he is truly a seat-controlled horse, so he keeps going. and going. and going. My own back is pretty stiff but it's loosening up and last ride was slightly better.

    I'll go and see a coach soon for some eyes on the ground but we're not ready yet, I don't want to waste their time as we have a few things to work through on our own first.

    Voice aid is a great idea, can't believe I forgot that!
    Keeping him bent might also do the trick as he really needs a good outside rein at the moment. Now that I talk about it out loud I think I'm unintentionally giving out my outside rein as soon as I hit the longside and that's when he seems to take it as a queue to go more forward. It's not just faster, it's bloody big, he is a big mover. I'll keep him bent and turn off into a circle and see how I go, never give him a chance to anticipate where we're going.
    Last edited by leesa; 05-03-19 at 04:07 PM.

  4. #14
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    For midders ….

    https://dressagetoday.com/instruction/walk-queen-gaits-25489

    Within France’s rich equestrian tradition, the walk has always deserved to be called the “queen of gaits” because of the benefits that both horse and rider can derive from this gait.
    The great François de Lubersac, a master from the legendary School of Versailles in the 18th century, recognized that in dressage training, the first gait in which to train is always the walk.
    Remarkably, de Lubersac, trained his horses only at the walk, and when he decided that they were ready, his horses were able to do everything at all gaits
    The only thing wrong with a horse is that it is usually attached to a human

  5. #15
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    I don’t argue with that teeg but some would. You have picked a tidbit from a French school adherent perhaps? I wonder does France still follow that tradition?

  6. #16
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    I like the theory that walk is a reward, a release of pressure, a mental break for a horse. If you give it, it's always a safe place for the horse after bigger efforts at other movements. A good habit to develop. And can be used as training once relaxation and even rhythm is achieved, as a collected walk can then be eventually developed.
    Last edited by opensky; 05-03-19 at 08:41 PM.
    Without a horse you're half complete.

  7. #17
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    Success!
    I think he just has it in his mind that the longside is for powering down, probably a relic from his last lot of rehab when I sent him away to a coach/rider for 3 months. Before sending him he was all scrunched up and stiff (paddock rest) and she must have spent a lot of time getting him to lengthen and just go in long straight lines to open him up.
    He seems to think that is legitimately what I want because as soon as I make a clear aid asking him for something else, he just does it no questions asked. I gather they must have gone around the outside track a lot because as soon as we get to the longside and go straight, he's off, like a well-rehearsed routine. But this morning was better.

    To keep on-topic... do you all warm up in the walk? Would you ever consider not warming up in the walk?

  8. #18
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    Yes of course Leesa. As always ... it depends.

  9. #19

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    I have a question regarding the term of train here.
    When saying train here, do you mean teach from scratch, or do you teach at walk then practice at other gaits.
    Hoping I'm saying what i mean properly. I remember being taught also not to train in walk as you can wreck the walk, but find it so hard to teach anything at a trot.

  10. #20
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    There is no reason not to school the horse at the walk.
    Everything happens slowly and the less balanced rider can train without the confusion of movement.
    Simple things are always the most important.. halt.. walk on.. circle.. the difficulty of each of these exercises is multiplied tenfold at the trot.
    I teach the bend at the walk, I teach yielding at the walk, I teach relaxation and attention at the walk….. and each lesson is replayed at the trot and canter ONLY WHEN it is rock solid at the walk..

    'nuff sed….
    The only thing wrong with a horse is that it is usually attached to a human

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