Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 32

Thread: Training at the walk

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    1,529

    Default

    I have the same problem as leesa, re my own stiffness and have found that leg yielding at the walk has made it so much easier to achieve at the trot! i do lots of circling and serpentines with small bits of sitting. all of which are helping with my lack of suppleness! Such a good horse to put up with me!!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    5,866

    Default

    Teeg I have to ask... and believe me I have been sitting on my hands for a few days ... do you trot when you are schooling your horse? Ever? Canter? If so - what do you do when you are trotting/cantering? You have to turn some time ....

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia.
    Posts
    5,519

    Default

    do you trot when you are schooling your horse ?

    No , I mostly just try to sit quietly

    what do you do when you are trotting/cantering

    Same as Q1

    Read wot I rote old mate… no need to sit on your hands

    I opine = (JMO No more and no less) … that teaching the horse the aid and the required response is initially better done at the walk
    I already said that after the walk responses are stable, seek the same responses at other gaits
    The only thing wrong with a horse is that it is usually attached to a human

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    5,866

    Default

    I know.. just still trying I guess. Thanks Taff for a good subject. Perhaps we should ask Zorro to return? Things were interesting in those days. Pity Bill banned him. ....

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia.
    Posts
    5,519

    Default

    A phoenix like Zorro or the goose or the bush basher (what was his name) any other rabble rouser would fail simply because there is no rabble to rouse.. such is life….
    The only thing wrong with a horse is that it is usually attached to a human

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    South East Victoria
    Posts
    10,212

    Default

    It is only the German Training Scale that says there is no impulsion in the walk. The German Training scale is basically an abbreviation of the "H. Dv. 12 German Cavalry Manual: On the Training Horse and Rider". It certainly doesn't relate back to the classical era.

    However, even Steinbrecht recognised that there are problems with the way people school the walk. As the horse always has 1 - 3 feet on the ground in walk it is always at risk of being compressed by the hand if the rider drives the horse into it mistakenly believing that will make collection.

    Instead of learning how to use lateral exercises and develop the bending of the hindleg joints riders try to shorten the horse by pushing the hindquarters to the hand. This causes the back to tighten and can make the walk lose it's four beat purity. Release the neck and the back and then the walk can correct.

    You can teach the horse all the exercises in the walk, turn about the forehand / haunches, leg yield, shoulder-in. renvers, half pass etc.
    "One must avoid using force, for I have never seen anything positive come out of a horse if such is the case".

    Antoine De Pluvinel

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia.
    Posts
    5,519

    Default

    forward before bend (Germanic) .. or bend before forward (Classical) ?
    The only thing wrong with a horse is that it is usually attached to a human

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    5,866

    Default

    I tried to avoid bringing lack of rider ability into this. I feel it helps no one. It’s the duty of the rider to make things easy for the horse and if he can’t then why is he trying to train?

    If you get on a horse and walk, try the different walks (extended, free, medium, collected,) it is very difficult if you are conscientious enough to know and concentrate on the correct footfall. Much easier at the trot or canter (if you can ride) because you do have that impulsion you need to maintain the rhythm and forwardness.

    The walk must be energetic and active and forward-thinking - impulsion doesn’t come into it. Once the rider starts fiddling trying to get, for example, a proper leg yield at walk, the activity and energy is easily lost. So unless our rider REALLY is experienced, then yes, the horse will do his legyield, his shoulder-in, but he will have lost his “desire to move forward” and that will transfer to the exercises at the trot. Great care is needed.

    Teeg you know I don’t like “Germanic” as opposed to “classical”. Dressage is classical and there are plenty of schools of thought, not just 2. If it works for you and your horse ....

    In my case I think it’s so very important, especially with these big warmbloods, to never ever never cause the horse to lose his desire to go forward. With some of these great monster horses they have to be taught the desire, but once they have it they go and that is so terribly important. Otherwise they jib, prop, rear - all those horrible things. Forward is everything. So if you want to teach them to bend you HAVE to have forward and your lively little horses have that desire in spades but not all horses do.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia.
    Posts
    5,519

    Default

    So if you want to teach them to bend you HAVE to have forward

    While I sympathise with the truck drivers trying to teach their trucks to dance , we are talking about diffrn't strokes.
    Basic understanding of requests (aids) and basic steering and yielding are best done at the walk.
    It's fair to say that this element of the schooling is complementary to instilling a go button (in a truck horse) .. and/or teaching a stop button in a Ferrari horse.
    A schooling session should encompass a range of tasks calm forward straight et al.
    Of course the germans assume that if the nag is on fire with forward it will also be straight which is an exercise in human egocentricity.
    The horse who is taught to bend from day one stays straight because there is minimal bend input ( no horse is ever straight .. its just the legs they want on one track )
    gotta go now more later

    The only thing wrong with a horse is that it is usually attached to a human

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    5,866

    Default

    Oh dear teeg. I think with your prejudices there is nothing to say. There are so many more variables than you seem to allow for, so many different riders, horses, schools of thought. There is no black and white.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •