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Thread: warmbloods with laminitis?

  1. #1
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    Default warmbloods with laminitis?

    How common is it for a warmblood to get laminitis?
    I've got a plump 19yo gelding who's lame on his nearside fore but (for now) only on hard surfaces. Doesn't seem to have any complaints about walking/trotting/cantering in the deep sand parts of an arena... so I'm inclined to think it's not muscles, tendons or knees. But is lame on a hard flat surface when on that rein so I think it's in the foot.

    I'm going to hoof test him tomorrow but I'm thinking it might be early laminitis, he has a pulse easily felt in both front feet but I wouldn't say it's thumping.
    I wouldn't have thought it likely to be an abscess as there's no separation, no thrush, nowhere for anything to have gotten in to fester. Hoof doesn't feel hot.

    Buuuuuut he did have some blood/bruising in his frog when his feet were trimmed a week ago. Trimmer thought he may have stepped on something big and hard.
    Is it possible to get an abscess up in the foot that way? As opposed to bacteria getting in from outside? Is it possible to get mechanical laminitis this way?

    He overreaches and bruises his heel in the paddock so it could be that too, or at 19 years of age it could also be something more to do with wear and tear.

    I'd forgotten how frustrating hoof problems are.

  2. #2
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    I would doubt it is laminitis but then I am not there looking at him and you are. Could well be an abscess as they are commonly caused by bruising. What did the trimmer do about the bruise - or suggest that you do ? It would have been good to draw it out. If he is overreaching in the paddock put bell boots on him and get a new farrier/trimmer. If they didn't do/suggest anything about the bruise I would be most disappointed - wary.

    On the other hand yes, it could be wear and tear - or degenerative joint disease - something like navicular syndrome, Ringbone, sidebone. You need a vet and nerve blocks and X-rays. If it isn't an abscess he could well be sore in both feet just one is worse than the other. The idea is to block the sore foot to see if he is lame on the other one. They usually are if it's degenerative joint disease.

    The first thing I would look at is that bloody bruise. Get some Animalintex and wrap his foot up and draw it out. I hope it's only a bruise. Would be interested to know. Good luck.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by midnightly View Post
    I would doubt it is laminitis but then I am not there looking at him and you are. Could well be an abscess as they are commonly caused by bruising. What did the trimmer do about the bruise - or suggest that you do ? It would have been good to draw it out. If he is overreaching in the paddock put bell boots on him and get a new farrier/trimmer. If they didn't do/suggest anything about the bruise I would be most disappointed - wary.

    On the other hand yes, it could be wear and tear - or degenerative joint disease - something like navicular syndrome, Ringbone, sidebone. You need a vet and nerve blocks and X-rays. If it isn't an abscess he could well be sore in both feet just one is worse than the other. The idea is to block the sore foot to see if he is lame on the other one. They usually are if it's degenerative joint disease.

    The first thing I would look at is that bloody bruise. Get some Animalintex and wrap his foot up and draw it out. I hope it's only a bruise. Would be interested to know. Good luck.
    I don't think it's the farrier, his feet have never looked so good. His heels opened up, he's developing some concavity, his frogs have widened and he has a nice clear heel-first landing.
    But he does have a bit of a twisted pelvis from old injury which I think is what makes him clock himself as he doesn't track straight on two lines.

    The bruising in the frog was only in the outer layers, it disappeared once the frog was tidied up but was apparently indicative that he'd stood on something at some point. He does still have bruising in his heel.

    It's a bit soon for xrays. Pretty sure my vet/s already think that I call too soon so I'm going to at least give it a few days to investigate possible abscess, monitor digital pulse or for it to be a one-off mystery that disappears as quickly as it came on.
    Last edited by leesa; 24-03-19 at 11:46 AM.

  4. #4
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    You need a set of hoof testers buy or borrow
    The only thing wrong with a horse is that it is usually attached to a human

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgh05 View Post
    You need a set of hoof testers buy or borrow
    I have a set of hoof testers. As per first post I am testing him today when it cools down a bit, it's damn hot today!

  6. #6
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    The bruising is worse tonight and is now visible on the other side of the heel bulb of his nearside front foot, and there's also a bit of blood visible in his white line.
    He has a decent pulse in both front feet but no heat that I could feel.
    He is sore in his heel with the hoof testers but that's probably no big surprise given the bruising.
    Even still, something isn't right, my spidey senses are tingling.


  7. #7
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    Well that is a decent bruise, and could be your problem, IMHO of course. Big horses can get laminitis, mostly it begins with what they seem to call Sub Clinical laminitis. What I have noticed is odd fatty deposits, certainly overweight, cresty in the neck, and the cavity above the eye is sort of filled out and fatter than a many horse with a sunken eye socket, if a gelding they have a fatty looking sheath area too. They are usually ouchy on grass, a leg can seem to fall in non existent holes, like a shoulder drops on you ( all this can be from grasses too, like paspalum staggers) Your horses foot looks fine, you have what appears to be a non stretched white line, so bruising looks like a culprit to me.

  8. #8
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    You could easily have a deep seated abscess behind that bruise that takes weeks to form and erupt. Pain in the butt when that happens. Then you need to watch out for tissue granulation because they can get that in heel abscesses.
    "One must avoid using force, for I have never seen anything positive come out of a horse if such is the case".

    Antoine De Pluvinel

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bats_79 View Post
    You could easily have a deep seated abscess behind that bruise that takes weeks to form and erupt. Pain in the butt when that happens. Then you need to watch out for tissue granulation because they can get that in heel abscesses.
    I hope not. It's looking pretty good now, the bruising has more than halved so hopefully it was just bruising on the surface and there's nothing lurking deeper in the foot.
    No point checking if he's still lame on it though as now he's got a decent slice on another foot.

    My 19yo cat died unexpectedly at the vet's yesterday while she was in for the day to get some fluids and I didn't make it back to the clinic in time, so the world seems to not like me very much at the moment.


  10. #10
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    Seems to me you have a reason for the digital pulse in both feet Poor boy he must be sore! I'm sure the bruise is your problem I'd be doing what midnightly suggested and poulticing. Good luck

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