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Thread: Winter and all things colicky

  1. #1
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    Question Winter and all things colicky

    Hi all

    My boys are 19 now. The OTTB one (Anabatik) decided to eat a bunch of hay, and not drink any water on that super chilly day we had last Friday. He lives in a paddock with his best mate Oakypoke, so I did not realise this until just after lunch on Saturday when he started to sit down and rest a bit more than usual. Some reckon I'm a bit overreactive with such things but this is one day I'm glad I called the vet. It took her 40 mins to arrive and by the time she did, he was very restless, rolling, kicking at his gutz, getting up, going down, very animated and clearly in a lot of pain.

    Vet was very concerned too, but thankfully with a couple of shots, a stomach tap, a rectal exam and a few litres of paraffin, he was a much happier boy. He was a little bit quiet on Sunday but is back to his normal mischevious self now.

    So the vet commented it would be good to let him graze on grass only and not feed hay for a few days (um...yeah we dont have much grazing at all hence me feeding hay) and we went over his diet. Soaked mash and speedibeet. The mash was once pellets but I like to make a warm speedibeet mash in winter and they seem to love it. Add Lucerne, oaten and teff hay which are the three I can normally buy. I mix them up, often putting out a net with one of each in it to get them through the day.

    The vet noted it had been 'quite a day for colics' and she had already seen several ponies as well as large horses for same.

    She mentioned the only other thing I can do really is add electrolytes to his feed to entice him to drink.

    They drink out of either a bathtub, or a 44 gal plastic drum that is cut in half. I thought that's going to be cold right? So I put a kiddies clam shell (dog pool?) in their paddock which is about 4 inches deep but quite wide. Turns out they do seem to prefer drinking from that, I'm guessing as the sun during the day warms the water.

    HOWEVER...I am still finding they aren't really drinking a lot. Certainly not as much as I would like. So wondering what others do to entice their horses to drink in winter? It seems to me that the older they get, the more picky they are with this?
    OakyPoke

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    They might be like me in winter, I just do not get as thirsty, perhaps there is also dew ( but maybe you need grass for that) Was it new hay as in a different lot or anything?
    Another thought from a the only horse I had colic a couple of times, was that he had a really high worm count compared to the other 2 in my paddock, he always seemed to eat around anything.
    I am feeding Teff hay also and there have been a few people around here insist its been detrimental to their horse, like you mine only get a biscuit of that and some oaten hay , I still have a bit of grass, but lack of rain here and I mowed it plenty means not much as no rain for ages here either.
    One person told me to boil some water and add it.. umm I am retired but..

  3. #3
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    did you try adding a bit of molasses to the water ?

  4. #4
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    Speaking of colic.
    How long does it take some people to seek treatment for a colicky horse ?????
    They should be facing big cruelty charges IMHO.

    Trainers suspended after pleading guilty to welfare charge
    http://www.racing.com/news/2019-06-2...pyvXfNGnXnpc0Y



    Racing New South Wales has suspended three members of a training partnership for failing to provide adequate veterinary treatment to one of their horses.

    Canberra trainers Barbara Joseph, Paul Jones and Matt Jones fronted Racing NSW stewards on Wednesday at the continuation of an inquiry that was opened on May 19 this year.

    It was in relation to the circumstances surrounding the death of I Am Rocky in February this year and the care the four-year-old entire was afforded in the lead-up to its death.

    In addition to one charge under AR103(4), for failing to lodge a stable return for I Am Rocky despite the horse having been in work for approximately nine weeks, the training partners were also issued one charge under AR231(1)(b)(iii).

    Among the particulars of that charge were:

    * At approximately 4am on Saturday, 23 February 2019, co-trainer Mr M. Jones became aware that I Am Rocky was displaying symptoms of colic.

    * At approximately 8:09am on Saturday, 23 February 2019, Mr P. Jones became aware that I Am Rocky was again displaying symptoms of colic.

    * That during Saturday, 23 February 2019, stable foreperson Mr S. Jamieson had observed that I Am Rocky had “been lethargic all day”.

    * That during Saturday, 23 February 2019, they did fail to provide for veterinary treatment of I Am Rocky when the horse was displaying symptoms of colic and such treatment was necessary for the horse.

    * That after observing that I Am Rocky was dull and lethargic in its stable at approximately 7am on Sunday, 24 February 2019, licensed stablehand Ms L. Fehre contacted Mr S. Jamieson soon after and reported to him words to the effect “He looks unwell and he probably needs a vet”.

    * That at no time did they, subsequent to Saturday, 23 February 2019 and whilst I Am Rocky remained in their care, control and supervision at their registered racing stables provide for veterinary treatment of the horse, when such treatment was necessary for the horse.

    * I Am Rocky was found deceased in its stable at approximately 7:30pm on Sunday, 24 February 2019 by stable foreperson Mr S. Jamieson.

    * A post-mortem examination report completed by Dr S. Raidal, Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (Charles Sturt University), on 26 February 2019, provided a gross diagnosis of right dorsal displacement of the large colon, likely secondary to diffuse typhlocolitis ultimately was the cause of the death of I Am Rocky. The Report also identified and described numerous superficial wounds and subcutaneous haemorrhages, consistent with trauma following an episode of uncontrolled colic pain.

    AR231(1) states that it is an offence for any person in charge of a horse to fail to provide veterinary treatment to a horse when necessary.

    The four-month suspension under the second charge was reduced from six months owing to a guilty plea from the three training partners, while they were also fined $200 under charge one.

  5. #5
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    Thankyou and yes, that maybe seemed to help? The tub was empty and at the other side of the paddock when I got home so...
    OakyPoke

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by acaciaalba View Post
    Speaking of colic.
    How long does it take some people to seek treatment for a colicky horse ?????
    They should be facing big cruelty charges IMHO.

    Trainers suspended after pleading guilty to welfare charge
    http://www.racing.com/news/2019-06-2...pyvXfNGnXnpc0Y



    .
    I agree. This made me sick to the stomach. I saw the article on a racing FB page. I mentioned I'd just had the vet out, after hours, paid travel, had stomach tap and rectal exam to be as sure as we could be about things....plus the normal shots and paraffin and it set me back only 500 dollars. I couldn't imagine any horse person not having at the very least that amount of money in the bank...and I cannot imagine any true horse person denying basic medical help for the horses in their care. A couple of people said it may be an insurance claim...I dont think anyone could come up with an absolute and reasonable explanation as to why the horse was so badly neglected, particularly when the worker there reported it as looking ill many times over a couple of days. if they wanted to save the horse, then as we all know with colic early intervention is best and can possibly rectify things quickly and cheaply. I was quoted 8 thousand for an obstruction needing surgery and around 15 thousand for a full bowel rotation needing correction. Suddenly 500 dollars looks pretty good...
    OakyPoke

  7. #7
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    Oh I feel sick - that poor horse. The penalty seems rather lenient in my opinion.
    OakyPoke - You could soak your hay in water, I use maybe 2 litres a biscuit, leave it for at east 15 mins before feeding, this way you know they're at least getting some water into their guts.

  8. #8
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    Thankyou....yes I used to only soak the lucerne but I'm thinking why not just soak the lot....good thinking!
    OakyPoke

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