Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23

Thread: Capeweed eradication?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central West NSW.
    Posts
    73

    Default

    Thanks opensky, maybe knapsack spraying with Hammer is the way to go. I've written to the company that makes it, asking about exclusion times for horses.

    My DH is arranging a smaller holding paddock for one of our mares - sheep have already been in there and got rid of the weeds, but the fences are double barb at the top, so we'll have to rig up standoffs and electric tape.
    Last edited by Barbelle; 27-08-09 at 10:19 AM.
    We have men of iron and steeds of gold.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Adelaide Hills
    Posts
    825

    Default

    Capeweed does not cause stringhalt, it is the flat weed/english daisy with the little yellow flowers and has a milky residue come out if you break the stalk which causes stringhalt. Capeweed wont harm horses at all, the worst it will do is cause diarrhea. The problem it does cause is that it stops any other pasture growing. Spraying with MCPA at the correct growth cycle will kill it but it will take several years of spraying to totally get rid of it plus pasture improvement will be required.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central West NSW.
    Posts
    73

    Default

    I've been frantically googling all the info on capeweed for the last few days, and there seems to be pretty strong opinion that it will cause stringhalt.
    There is a half page article in the sept 07 issue of Australian Certified Organic Magazine (p29) that neatly summarises much of what I've been reading. A quote from the article:

    "Stringhalt appears at present to be prolific upon the first growth after drought.
    A proliferation of magnesium-depleting weeds, such as capeweed and flatweed (false dandelion) are the worst. Horses eating these weeds succumb very quickly to Stringhalt.

    The treatment I advise is two small low protein feeds daily; add a heaped dessertspoon of dolomite, plus a dessertspoon of yellow sulphur to each."

    It also advises improving the paddock with dolomite and gypsum. Which we will do.
    We have men of iron and steeds of gold.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Thirlmere NSW
    Posts
    6,183

    Default

    Dolomite is a very cheap and inorganic form of Calcuim and Magnesium, and has to be fed in quite large volumes. Even though I fed Dolomite I still had massive problems with not enough calcium.

    Dolomite is good for putting on the ground but I found it did absolutely nothing for my horse. I was feeding him 4 large heaped tablespoons over 2 feeds a day, no difference. What I feed him now I feed 15grams of a calcium/magnesium and have an additional organic source of magnesium with boron and now he gets 1gram per feed a day. Big difference.

    Just be aware, cheap is that....cheap.
    Throw your heart over the fence and the horse will follow

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Adelaide Hills
    Posts
    825

    Default

    The problem is that people get confused between capeweed and flatweed they are not the same. It is the flatweed that causes stringhalt. Flatweed tends to come up mainly in wet areas ie swaps or where water will lay especially after a particularly dry spell as happened last year. If it was capeweed there would be a lot more cases of stringhalt as capeweed is extremely prolific but does not actually do any harm other than choke out other pasture.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    melbourne, victoria, australia.
    Posts
    1,950

    Default

    Re. the Stringhalt, I dont think there is any absolute definite proof of which weed causes it, or why some horses are prone to it but not others.

    The only horse I ever knew to get it (very badly, he couldn't back up, his legs went to jelly) was a big TB, but there were 5 other horses on the same property who ate the same pasture and showed no ill effects.
    That was about 3 years ago, after a drought summer, when young capeweed and false dandelion were both in the pasture. Because both tend to go together its hard to say which is the main culprit

    At my place. after spraying in autumn, there are no broadleaf weeds at all through spring or summer. They start appearing again in early autumn due to seeds blowing in...though we get less each year. Im not sure with my coastal sandy soil you could ever completely eradicate them. A few years without spraying Im sure they would re-establish themselves, the cunning little buggers

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    .
    Posts
    3,937

    Default

    We had the vet out a couple of months' back for suspected stringhalt. He was quite adamant that the latest evidence was that flatweed, not capeweed, was true culprit. More specifically the fungus that forms on the underside of the leaves in wet conditions. The horse we had didn't end up having stringhalt, but I found out a whole lot more about it.
    Keep spraying and improving your soil and reseed any bare or high traffic areas whenever you can. I hate capeweed.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    near Orbost, eastern Victoria
    Posts
    7,702

    Default

    Dolomite inorganic???? Dolomite is ground up clay - which is pretty dammed organic in my book. It is also used alot on certificed organic farms, so..... if it was inorganic it, apart from being useless, would not be allowed to be used.

    There are also different grades of dolomite - the cheap stuff, $6 a 20kg bag, is for garden use only. I buy Mudgee dolomite, $2 per kilo, which is the best quality in Australia. It also pays to ask for the calcium % in dolomite as it can differ greatly. The local stuff we have here is only 15% but the one from Buchan is 33%.

    If my horse was suspected to have stringhalt, or grazing on pasture with a predominance of these weeds Id be giving magensium - not just dolomite.
    East Gippsland Hoof Care A.C.E.H.P. - for balance, form & function
    www.wix.com/yunarickard/eghc
    "There is none so foolish as he who thinks he can outwit nature"

    www.madeit.com.au/YRDesigns - beaded jewellery, handspun woollies, beanies, scarves, cards

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Thirlmere NSW
    Posts
    6,183

    Default

    Dolomite is inorganic in the respect it is not attached to an amino acid.

    Didnt' know there were different grades of Dolomite (well they are not at my local feed store that I know of). Thanks for that.

    I still prefer to feed what I feed now....I know it works.
    Throw your heart over the fence and the horse will follow

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    near Orbost, eastern Victoria
    Posts
    7,702

    Default

    Im not sure where you are getting your information from Garryngirl - but being inorganic is totally against all that I have read, learnt and been told in the past 20 or so years!!!

    I choose to use low refined, natural minerals because they are more readialy available to the body (and soil) and unlike alot of 'refined' minerals natural minerals are absorbed in the large intestine (NOT the kidneys) as nature intended. This is well known in natural/organic/sustainable farming circles.
    East Gippsland Hoof Care A.C.E.H.P. - for balance, form & function
    www.wix.com/yunarickard/eghc
    "There is none so foolish as he who thinks he can outwit nature"

    www.madeit.com.au/YRDesigns - beaded jewellery, handspun woollies, beanies, scarves, cards

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •